10th Class English Comprehension Question Bank

done Reading Comprehension

Question Bank
  • question_answer1)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Excerpts of the speech of Winston Churchill
    I have, myself, full confidence that if all do their duty, if nothing is neglected, and if the best arrangements are made, as they are being made, we shall prove ourselves once again able to defend our island home, to ride out the storm of war and to outlive the menace of tyranny, if necessary for years, if necessary alone. At any rate, that is what we are going to try to do. That is the resolve of His Majesty's Government - every man of them. That is the will of Parliament and the nation. The British Empire and the French Republic, linked together in their cause and in their need, will defend to the death their native soil, aiding each other like good comrades to the utmost of their strength. Even though large tracts of Europe and many old and famous States have fallen or may fall into the grip of the Gestapo and all the odious apparatus of Nazi rule, we shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end, we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and even if, which I do not for a moment believe, this island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God's good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old.
    Who was Winston Churchill?

    A) President of the USA.

    B) Prime Minister of Great Britain.

    C) Prime Minister of France.

    D) Prime Minister of Australia.

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  • question_answer2)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Excerpts of the speech of Winston Churchill
    I have, myself, full confidence that if all do their duty, if nothing is neglected, and if the best arrangements are made, as they are being made, we shall prove ourselves once again able to defend our island home, to ride out the storm of war and to outlive the menace of tyranny, if necessary for years, if necessary alone. At any rate, that is what we are going to try to do. That is the resolve of His Majesty's Government - every man of them. That is the will of Parliament and the nation. The British Empire and the French Republic, linked together in their cause and in their need, will defend to the death their native soil, aiding each other like good comrades to the utmost of their strength. Even though large tracts of Europe and many old and famous States have fallen or may fall into the grip of the Gestapo and all the odious apparatus of Nazi rule, we shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end, we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and even if, which I do not for a moment believe, this island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God's good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old.
    Synonym of ?Menace' is, _______

    A) Peril

    B) taste

    C) Condition

    D) manners

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  • question_answer3)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Excerpts of the speech of Winston Churchill
    I have, myself, full confidence that if all do their duty, if nothing is neglected, and if the best arrangements are made, as they are being made, we shall prove ourselves once again able to defend our island home, to ride out the storm of war and to outlive the menace of tyranny, if necessary for years, if necessary alone. At any rate, that is what we are going to try to do. That is the resolve of His Majesty's Government - every man of them. That is the will of Parliament and the nation. The British Empire and the French Republic, linked together in their cause and in their need, will defend to the death their native soil, aiding each other like good comrades to the utmost of their strength. Even though large tracts of Europe and many old and famous States have fallen or may fall into the grip of the Gestapo and all the odious apparatus of Nazi rule, we shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end, we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and even if, which I do not for a moment believe, this island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God's good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old.
    What according to him is 'New World'?

    A) India

    B) Japan

    C) Germany

    D) the USA

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  • question_answer4)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Excerpts of the speech of Winston Churchill
    I have, myself, full confidence that if all do their duty, if nothing is neglected, and if the best arrangements are made, as they are being made, we shall prove ourselves once again able to defend our island home, to ride out the storm of war and to outlive the menace of tyranny, if necessary for years, if necessary alone. At any rate, that is what we are going to try to do. That is the resolve of His Majesty's Government - every man of them. That is the will of Parliament and the nation. The British Empire and the French Republic, linked together in their cause and in their need, will defend to the death their native soil, aiding each other like good comrades to the utmost of their strength. Even though large tracts of Europe and many old and famous States have fallen or may fall into the grip of the Gestapo and all the odious apparatus of Nazi rule, we shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end, we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and even if, which I do not for a moment believe, this island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God's good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old.
    Antonym of 'tyranny' is, _______

    A) Trouble

    B) rule

    C) Democracy

    D) None

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  • question_answer5)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Excerpts of the speech of Winston Churchill
    I have, myself, full confidence that if all do their duty, if nothing is neglected, and if the best arrangements are made, as they are being made, we shall prove ourselves once again able to defend our island home, to ride out the storm of war and to outlive the menace of tyranny, if necessary for years, if necessary alone. At any rate, that is what we are going to try to do. That is the resolve of His Majesty's Government - every man of them. That is the will of Parliament and the nation. The British Empire and the French Republic, linked together in their cause and in their need, will defend to the death their native soil, aiding each other like good comrades to the utmost of their strength. Even though large tracts of Europe and many old and famous States have fallen or may fall into the grip of the Gestapo and all the odious apparatus of Nazi rule, we shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end, we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and even if, which I do not for a moment believe, this island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God's good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old.
    Why does Churchill repeat the phrase "we shall fight" over and over?

    A) It was his habit to repeat words.

    B) He wanted to emphasize on fighting.

    C) The audience was scared to fight.

    D) He wanted to raise the morale of people and imbibe in their minds the determination to fight tooth and nail.

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  • question_answer6)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Excerpts of the speech of Winston Churchill
    I have, myself, full confidence that if all do their duty, if nothing is neglected, and if the best arrangements are made, as they are being made, we shall prove ourselves once again able to defend our island home, to ride out the storm of war and to outlive the menace of tyranny, if necessary for years, if necessary alone. At any rate, that is what we are going to try to do. That is the resolve of His Majesty's Government - every man of them. That is the will of Parliament and the nation. The British Empire and the French Republic, linked together in their cause and in their need, will defend to the death their native soil, aiding each other like good comrades to the utmost of their strength. Even though large tracts of Europe and many old and famous States have fallen or may fall into the grip of the Gestapo and all the odious apparatus of Nazi rule, we shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end, we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and even if, which I do not for a moment believe, this island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God's good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old.
    What is the reason for the fight?

    A) To defend and keep the island nation independent.

    B) To show the strength of Great Britain to others.

    C) To get even with Nazis.

    D) To keep the nation active.

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  • question_answer7)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Excerpts of the speech of Winston Churchill
    I have, myself, full confidence that if all do their duty, if nothing is neglected, and if the best arrangements are made, as they are being made, we shall prove ourselves once again able to defend our island home, to ride out the storm of war and to outlive the menace of tyranny, if necessary for years, if necessary alone. At any rate, that is what we are going to try to do. That is the resolve of His Majesty's Government - every man of them. That is the will of Parliament and the nation. The British Empire and the French Republic, linked together in their cause and in their need, will defend to the death their native soil, aiding each other like good comrades to the utmost of their strength. Even though large tracts of Europe and many old and famous States have fallen or may fall into the grip of the Gestapo and all the odious apparatus of Nazi rule, we shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end, we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and even if, which I do not for a moment believe, this island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God's good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old.
    With which country were they fighting?

    A) Germany.

    B) India.

    C) The USA.

    D) France.

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  • question_answer8)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Excerpts of the speech of Winston Churchill
    I have, myself, full confidence that if all do their duty, if nothing is neglected, and if the best arrangements are made, as they are being made, we shall prove ourselves once again able to defend our island home, to ride out the storm of war and to outlive the menace of tyranny, if necessary for years, if necessary alone. At any rate, that is what we are going to try to do. That is the resolve of His Majesty's Government - every man of them. That is the will of Parliament and the nation. The British Empire and the French Republic, linked together in their cause and in their need, will defend to the death their native soil, aiding each other like good comrades to the utmost of their strength. Even though large tracts of Europe and many old and famous States have fallen or may fall into the grip of the Gestapo and all the odious apparatus of Nazi rule, we shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end, we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and even if, which I do not for a moment believe, this island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God's good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old.
    Which two countries are taking part in the war?

    A) India and Great Britain.

    B) Great Britain and France.

    C) Germany and France.

    D) USA and Great Britain.

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  • question_answer9)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Abraham Lincoln
    Though Abe had a national reputation, the Republican nomination for president in the Election of 1860 seemed elusive. Powerful Republicans William Seward from New York, Salmon P. Chase from Ohio and Edward Bates from Missouri seemed to be the front-runners. On February 27, 1860, however, Abe was invited to speak before a crowd of powerful republicans at Cooper Union (a university) in New York City. Abe's anti-slavery speech, in which he claimed the Founding Fathers and authors of the Declaration of independence would have prohibited the extension of slavery into new territories, left a lasting impression on the members of the audience and propelled him to legitimacy among the Republican candidates running for presidency. The powerful publisher Horace Greeley called it "one of the happiest and most convincing political arguments ever made in this City... No man ever made such an impression on his first appeal to a New-York audience.?? After the speech, Abe decided that he would at least make an attempt for the Republican nomination to the presidency. He assembled a team of devoted campaigners who called Lincoln "The Rail Candidate". On May 9-10, Abe and his team travelled to the Republican National Convention in Decatur, Illinois, where his savvy team of supporters worked the convention for endorsements. Seward and Chase, though powerful and well-known politicians, had created enough enemies over the years to prove vulnerable and had alienated parts of the Republican Party. Though Abe believed slavery was evil, his moderate (rather than radical) stance appealed to many, as did his support for the nation's internal improvements and protective tariff. Furthermore, Abe was extremely popular in the western states, and because the convention was in his home state, thousands of his supporters descended upon Decatur. While Seward led on the first and second ballots (though he didn't get enough votes to win), Lincoln won the nomination on the third ballot when the chairman of the Ohio Republican Delegation was convinced to shift his votes to Lincoln. Seward, who thought his nomination assured, was crushed and Chase couldn't even manage to draw full support from his home state of Ohio. Now that Abe had secured the Republican nomination for President, he had a chance to win the Presidential election. Abe is elected the 16th President.
    Though Abe had a national reputation, the Republican nomination for president in the Election of 1860 seemed elusive. What does elusive mean?

    A) Possible

    B) impossible

    C) Likely

    D) hard to get

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  • question_answer10)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Abraham Lincoln
    Though Abe had a national reputation, the Republican nomination for president in the Election of 1860 seemed elusive. Powerful Republicans William Seward from New York, Salmon P. Chase from Ohio and Edward Bates from Missouri seemed to be the front-runners. On February 27, 1860, however, Abe was invited to speak before a crowd of powerful republicans at Cooper Union (a university) in New York City. Abe's anti-slavery speech, in which he claimed the Founding Fathers and authors of the Declaration of independence would have prohibited the extension of slavery into new territories, left a lasting impression on the members of the audience and propelled him to legitimacy among the Republican candidates running for presidency. The powerful publisher Horace Greeley called it "one of the happiest and most convincing political arguments ever made in this City... No man ever made such an impression on his first appeal to a New-York audience.?? After the speech, Abe decided that he would at least make an attempt for the Republican nomination to the presidency. He assembled a team of devoted campaigners who called Lincoln "The Rail Candidate". On May 9-10, Abe and his team travelled to the Republican National Convention in Decatur, Illinois, where his savvy team of supporters worked the convention for endorsements. Seward and Chase, though powerful and well-known politicians, had created enough enemies over the years to prove vulnerable and had alienated parts of the Republican Party. Though Abe believed slavery was evil, his moderate (rather than radical) stance appealed to many, as did his support for the nation's internal improvements and protective tariff. Furthermore, Abe was extremely popular in the western states, and because the convention was in his home state, thousands of his supporters descended upon Decatur. While Seward led on the first and second ballots (though he didn't get enough votes to win), Lincoln won the nomination on the third ballot when the chairman of the Ohio Republican Delegation was convinced to shift his votes to Lincoln. Seward, who thought his nomination assured, was crushed and Chase couldn't even manage to draw full support from his home state of Ohio. Now that Abe had secured the Republican nomination for President, he had a chance to win the Presidential election. Abe is elected the 16th President.
    How would you describe Horace Greeley's response to Lincoln's speech at the Cooper Union?

    A) He agreed with parts of it.

    B) He disagreed.

    C) He thought it was inappropriate.

    D) He strongly agreed with it.

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  • question_answer11)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Abraham Lincoln
    Though Abe had a national reputation, the Republican nomination for president in the Election of 1860 seemed elusive. Powerful Republicans William Seward from New York, Salmon P. Chase from Ohio and Edward Bates from Missouri seemed to be the front-runners. On February 27, 1860, however, Abe was invited to speak before a crowd of powerful republicans at Cooper Union (a university) in New York City. Abe's anti-slavery speech, in which he claimed the Founding Fathers and authors of the Declaration of independence would have prohibited the extension of slavery into new territories, left a lasting impression on the members of the audience and propelled him to legitimacy among the Republican candidates running for presidency. The powerful publisher Horace Greeley called it "one of the happiest and most convincing political arguments ever made in this City... No man ever made such an impression on his first appeal to a New-York audience.?? After the speech, Abe decided that he would at least make an attempt for the Republican nomination to the presidency. He assembled a team of devoted campaigners who called Lincoln "The Rail Candidate". On May 9-10, Abe and his team travelled to the Republican National Convention in Decatur, Illinois, where his savvy team of supporters worked the convention for endorsements. Seward and Chase, though powerful and well-known politicians, had created enough enemies over the years to prove vulnerable and had alienated parts of the Republican Party. Though Abe believed slavery was evil, his moderate (rather than radical) stance appealed to many, as did his support for the nation's internal improvements and protective tariff. Furthermore, Abe was extremely popular in the western states, and because the convention was in his home state, thousands of his supporters descended upon Decatur. While Seward led on the first and second ballots (though he didn't get enough votes to win), Lincoln won the nomination on the third ballot when the chairman of the Ohio Republican Delegation was convinced to shift his votes to Lincoln. Seward, who thought his nomination assured, was crushed and Chase couldn't even manage to draw full support from his home state of Ohio. Now that Abe had secured the Republican nomination for President, he had a chance to win the Presidential election. Abe is elected the 16th President.
    How did William Seward feel after the Republic National Convention?

    A) He felt betrayed.

    B) He felt happy for Lincoln.

    C) He was devastated.

    D) He felt "the best man won".

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  • question_answer12)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Abraham Lincoln
    Though Abe had a national reputation, the Republican nomination for president in the Election of 1860 seemed elusive. Powerful Republicans William Seward from New York, Salmon P. Chase from Ohio and Edward Bates from Missouri seemed to be the front-runners. On February 27, 1860, however, Abe was invited to speak before a crowd of powerful republicans at Cooper Union (a university) in New York City. Abe's anti-slavery speech, in which he claimed the Founding Fathers and authors of the Declaration of independence would have prohibited the extension of slavery into new territories, left a lasting impression on the members of the audience and propelled him to legitimacy among the Republican candidates running for presidency. The powerful publisher Horace Greeley called it "one of the happiest and most convincing political arguments ever made in this City... No man ever made such an impression on his first appeal to a New-York audience.?? After the speech, Abe decided that he would at least make an attempt for the Republican nomination to the presidency. He assembled a team of devoted campaigners who called Lincoln "The Rail Candidate". On May 9-10, Abe and his team travelled to the Republican National Convention in Decatur, Illinois, where his savvy team of supporters worked the convention for endorsements. Seward and Chase, though powerful and well-known politicians, had created enough enemies over the years to prove vulnerable and had alienated parts of the Republican Party. Though Abe believed slavery was evil, his moderate (rather than radical) stance appealed to many, as did his support for the nation's internal improvements and protective tariff. Furthermore, Abe was extremely popular in the western states, and because the convention was in his home state, thousands of his supporters descended upon Decatur. While Seward led on the first and second ballots (though he didn't get enough votes to win), Lincoln won the nomination on the third ballot when the chairman of the Ohio Republican Delegation was convinced to shift his votes to Lincoln. Seward, who thought his nomination assured, was crushed and Chase couldn't even manage to draw full support from his home state of Ohio. Now that Abe had secured the Republican nomination for President, he had a chance to win the Presidential election. Abe is elected the 16th President.
    Which of the following was probably not implied in Lincoln's speech at the Cooper Union?

    A) Slavery shouldn't be allowed in America's new territories.

    B) The Founding Fathers would have frowned on slavery.

    C) The territories should decide for themselves whether or not to allow slavery.

    D) People of all races and colours should have liberty.

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  • question_answer13)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Abraham Lincoln
    Though Abe had a national reputation, the Republican nomination for president in the Election of 1860 seemed elusive. Powerful Republicans William Seward from New York, Salmon P. Chase from Ohio and Edward Bates from Missouri seemed to be the front-runners. On February 27, 1860, however, Abe was invited to speak before a crowd of powerful republicans at Cooper Union (a university) in New York City. Abe's anti-slavery speech, in which he claimed the Founding Fathers and authors of the Declaration of independence would have prohibited the extension of slavery into new territories, left a lasting impression on the members of the audience and propelled him to legitimacy among the Republican candidates running for presidency. The powerful publisher Horace Greeley called it "one of the happiest and most convincing political arguments ever made in this City... No man ever made such an impression on his first appeal to a New-York audience.?? After the speech, Abe decided that he would at least make an attempt for the Republican nomination to the presidency. He assembled a team of devoted campaigners who called Lincoln "The Rail Candidate". On May 9-10, Abe and his team travelled to the Republican National Convention in Decatur, Illinois, where his savvy team of supporters worked the convention for endorsements. Seward and Chase, though powerful and well-known politicians, had created enough enemies over the years to prove vulnerable and had alienated parts of the Republican Party. Though Abe believed slavery was evil, his moderate (rather than radical) stance appealed to many, as did his support for the nation's internal improvements and protective tariff. Furthermore, Abe was extremely popular in the western states, and because the convention was in his home state, thousands of his supporters descended upon Decatur. While Seward led on the first and second ballots (though he didn't get enough votes to win), Lincoln won the nomination on the third ballot when the chairman of the Ohio Republican Delegation was convinced to shift his votes to Lincoln. Seward, who thought his nomination assured, was crushed and Chase couldn't even manage to draw full support from his home state of Ohio. Now that Abe had secured the Republican nomination for President, he had a chance to win the Presidential election. Abe is elected the 16th President.
    What according to publisher was the greatest moment?

    A) It was the speech that could be punished immediately.

    B) The publisher got some great material.

    C) No man ever made such an impression on his first appeal to a New-York audience.

    D) Abe decided that he would at least make an attempt for the Republican nomination to the presidency.

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  • question_answer14)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Abraham Lincoln
    Though Abe had a national reputation, the Republican nomination for president in the Election of 1860 seemed elusive. Powerful Republicans William Seward from New York, Salmon P. Chase from Ohio and Edward Bates from Missouri seemed to be the front-runners. On February 27, 1860, however, Abe was invited to speak before a crowd of powerful republicans at Cooper Union (a university) in New York City. Abe's anti-slavery speech, in which he claimed the Founding Fathers and authors of the Declaration of independence would have prohibited the extension of slavery into new territories, left a lasting impression on the members of the audience and propelled him to legitimacy among the Republican candidates running for presidency. The powerful publisher Horace Greeley called it "one of the happiest and most convincing political arguments ever made in this City... No man ever made such an impression on his first appeal to a New-York audience.?? After the speech, Abe decided that he would at least make an attempt for the Republican nomination to the presidency. He assembled a team of devoted campaigners who called Lincoln "The Rail Candidate". On May 9-10, Abe and his team travelled to the Republican National Convention in Decatur, Illinois, where his savvy team of supporters worked the convention for endorsements. Seward and Chase, though powerful and well-known politicians, had created enough enemies over the years to prove vulnerable and had alienated parts of the Republican Party. Though Abe believed slavery was evil, his moderate (rather than radical) stance appealed to many, as did his support for the nation's internal improvements and protective tariff. Furthermore, Abe was extremely popular in the western states, and because the convention was in his home state, thousands of his supporters descended upon Decatur. While Seward led on the first and second ballots (though he didn't get enough votes to win), Lincoln won the nomination on the third ballot when the chairman of the Ohio Republican Delegation was convinced to shift his votes to Lincoln. Seward, who thought his nomination assured, was crushed and Chase couldn't even manage to draw full support from his home state of Ohio. Now that Abe had secured the Republican nomination for President, he had a chance to win the Presidential election. Abe is elected the 16th President.
    What according to Abe was slavery?

    A) Necessary

    B) moderate

    C) Evil

    D) removable

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  • question_answer15)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Abraham Lincoln
    Though Abe had a national reputation, the Republican nomination for president in the Election of 1860 seemed elusive. Powerful Republicans William Seward from New York, Salmon P. Chase from Ohio and Edward Bates from Missouri seemed to be the front-runners. On February 27, 1860, however, Abe was invited to speak before a crowd of powerful republicans at Cooper Union (a university) in New York City. Abe's anti-slavery speech, in which he claimed the Founding Fathers and authors of the Declaration of independence would have prohibited the extension of slavery into new territories, left a lasting impression on the members of the audience and propelled him to legitimacy among the Republican candidates running for presidency. The powerful publisher Horace Greeley called it "one of the happiest and most convincing political arguments ever made in this City... No man ever made such an impression on his first appeal to a New-York audience.?? After the speech, Abe decided that he would at least make an attempt for the Republican nomination to the presidency. He assembled a team of devoted campaigners who called Lincoln "The Rail Candidate". On May 9-10, Abe and his team travelled to the Republican National Convention in Decatur, Illinois, where his savvy team of supporters worked the convention for endorsements. Seward and Chase, though powerful and well-known politicians, had created enough enemies over the years to prove vulnerable and had alienated parts of the Republican Party. Though Abe believed slavery was evil, his moderate (rather than radical) stance appealed to many, as did his support for the nation's internal improvements and protective tariff. Furthermore, Abe was extremely popular in the western states, and because the convention was in his home state, thousands of his supporters descended upon Decatur. While Seward led on the first and second ballots (though he didn't get enough votes to win), Lincoln won the nomination on the third ballot when the chairman of the Ohio Republican Delegation was convinced to shift his votes to Lincoln. Seward, who thought his nomination assured, was crushed and Chase couldn't even manage to draw full support from his home state of Ohio. Now that Abe had secured the Republican nomination for President, he had a chance to win the Presidential election. Abe is elected the 16th President.
    Who called Abe 'the rail candidate'?

    A) Devoted campaigners.

    B) The railway staff.

    C) His competitors.

    D) The publisher.

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  • question_answer16)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Abraham Lincoln
    Though Abe had a national reputation, the Republican nomination for president in the Election of 1860 seemed elusive. Powerful Republicans William Seward from New York, Salmon P. Chase from Ohio and Edward Bates from Missouri seemed to be the front-runners. On February 27, 1860, however, Abe was invited to speak before a crowd of powerful republicans at Cooper Union (a university) in New York City. Abe's anti-slavery speech, in which he claimed the Founding Fathers and authors of the Declaration of independence would have prohibited the extension of slavery into new territories, left a lasting impression on the members of the audience and propelled him to legitimacy among the Republican candidates running for presidency. The powerful publisher Horace Greeley called it "one of the happiest and most convincing political arguments ever made in this City... No man ever made such an impression on his first appeal to a New-York audience.?? After the speech, Abe decided that he would at least make an attempt for the Republican nomination to the presidency. He assembled a team of devoted campaigners who called Lincoln "The Rail Candidate". On May 9-10, Abe and his team travelled to the Republican National Convention in Decatur, Illinois, where his savvy team of supporters worked the convention for endorsements. Seward and Chase, though powerful and well-known politicians, had created enough enemies over the years to prove vulnerable and had alienated parts of the Republican Party. Though Abe believed slavery was evil, his moderate (rather than radical) stance appealed to many, as did his support for the nation's internal improvements and protective tariff. Furthermore, Abe was extremely popular in the western states, and because the convention was in his home state, thousands of his supporters descended upon Decatur. While Seward led on the first and second ballots (though he didn't get enough votes to win), Lincoln won the nomination on the third ballot when the chairman of the Ohio Republican Delegation was convinced to shift his votes to Lincoln. Seward, who thought his nomination assured, was crushed and Chase couldn't even manage to draw full support from his home state of Ohio. Now that Abe had secured the Republican nomination for President, he had a chance to win the Presidential election. Abe is elected the 16th President.
    How could Lincoln win the Third ballot?

    A) Because of his luck.

    B) Because of no competition.

    C) Because of his popularity through the speech.

    D) Because the chairman of Ohio Republican Delegation shifted his votes to Lincoln.

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer17)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Nasreddin the Ferry Man
    Nasreddin once had an old boat, which he used to ferry people across the river. One day, he was taking a university professor to the other side. "What is the square root of 9?" asked the professor. "I don't know," answered Nasreddin. "How do you spell elephant?" asked the professor. "I have no idea/ replied Nasreddin. "Didn't you study anything at school?" demanded the professor, surprised. "No," said Nasreddin. "Then you wasted half your life," said the professor. Nasreddin was silent for a little while. Then he said: "Can you swim?" "No," said the professor. "Then you wasted ALL of your life," said Nasreddin. "We are sinking."
    What was Nasreddin's job?

    A) Professor

    B) Judge

    C) Orator

    D) Ferry man

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer18)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Nasreddin the Ferry Man
    Nasreddin once had an old boat, which he used to ferry people across the river. One day, he was taking a university professor to the other side. "What is the square root of 9?" asked the professor. "I don't know," answered Nasreddin. "How do you spell elephant?" asked the professor. "I have no idea/ replied Nasreddin. "Didn't you study anything at school?" demanded the professor, surprised. "No," said Nasreddin. "Then you wasted half your life," said the professor. Nasreddin was silent for a little while. Then he said: "Can you swim?" "No," said the professor. "Then you wasted ALL of your life," said Nasreddin. "We are sinking."
    What kind of question did the professor ask him first?

    A) A language question

    B) A history question

    C) A math?s question

    D) A physics question

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer19)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Nasreddin the Ferry Man
    Nasreddin once had an old boat, which he used to ferry people across the river. One day, he was taking a university professor to the other side. "What is the square root of 9?" asked the professor. "I don't know," answered Nasreddin. "How do you spell elephant?" asked the professor. "I have no idea/ replied Nasreddin. "Didn't you study anything at school?" demanded the professor, surprised. "No," said Nasreddin. "Then you wasted half your life," said the professor. Nasreddin was silent for a little while. Then he said: "Can you swim?" "No," said the professor. "Then you wasted ALL of your life," said Nasreddin. "We are sinking."
    What kind was the second question asked?

    A) A language question

    B) A math?s question

    C) A history question

    D) A physics question

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer20)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Nasreddin the Ferry Man
    Nasreddin once had an old boat, which he used to ferry people across the river. One day, he was taking a university professor to the other side. "What is the square root of 9?" asked the professor. "I don't know," answered Nasreddin. "How do you spell elephant?" asked the professor. "I have no idea/ replied Nasreddin. "Didn't you study anything at school?" demanded the professor, surprised. "No," said Nasreddin. "Then you wasted half your life," said the professor. Nasreddin was silent for a little while. Then he said: "Can you swim?" "No," said the professor. "Then you wasted ALL of your life," said Nasreddin. "We are sinking."
    Why didn't Nasreddin know any of the answers?

    A) He was a history professor.

    B) He couldn't swim.

    C) He never studied at school.

    D) He knew only physics.

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer21)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Nasreddin the Ferry Man
    Nasreddin once had an old boat, which he used to ferry people across the river. One day, he was taking a university professor to the other side. "What is the square root of 9?" asked the professor. "I don't know," answered Nasreddin. "How do you spell elephant?" asked the professor. "I have no idea/ replied Nasreddin. "Didn't you study anything at school?" demanded the professor, surprised. "No," said Nasreddin. "Then you wasted half your life," said the professor. Nasreddin was silent for a little while. Then he said: "Can you swim?" "No," said the professor. "Then you wasted ALL of your life," said Nasreddin. "We are sinking."
    Which man was probably able to swim?

    A) The professor

    B) Nasreddin

    C) a fish

    D) none

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer22)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Nasreddin the Ferry Man
    Nasreddin once had an old boat, which he used to ferry people across the river. One day, he was taking a university professor to the other side. "What is the square root of 9?" asked the professor. "I don't know," answered Nasreddin. "How do you spell elephant?" asked the professor. "I have no idea/ replied Nasreddin. "Didn't you study anything at school?" demanded the professor, surprised. "No," said Nasreddin. "Then you wasted half your life," said the professor. Nasreddin was silent for a little while. Then he said: "Can you swim?" "No," said the professor. "Then you wasted ALL of your life," said Nasreddin. "We are sinking."
    How did Nasreddin earn his living?

    A) By telling stories

    B) By teaching at school

    C) By ferrying people across the river.

    D) By fishing sitting in his ferry.

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer23)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Nasreddin the Ferry Man
    Nasreddin once had an old boat, which he used to ferry people across the river. One day, he was taking a university professor to the other side. "What is the square root of 9?" asked the professor. "I don't know," answered Nasreddin. "How do you spell elephant?" asked the professor. "I have no idea/ replied Nasreddin. "Didn't you study anything at school?" demanded the professor, surprised. "No," said Nasreddin. "Then you wasted half your life," said the professor. Nasreddin was silent for a little while. Then he said: "Can you swim?" "No," said the professor. "Then you wasted ALL of your life," said Nasreddin. "We are sinking."
    What was the professor's remark to Nasreddin?

    A) "You did not study at school."

    B) "How do you spell elephant?"

    C) "Then you wasted half your life".

    D) "I have no idea".

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer24)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Nasreddin the Ferry Man
    Nasreddin once had an old boat, which he used to ferry people across the river. One day, he was taking a university professor to the other side. "What is the square root of 9?" asked the professor. "I don't know," answered Nasreddin. "How do you spell elephant?" asked the professor. "I have no idea/ replied Nasreddin. "Didn't you study anything at school?" demanded the professor, surprised. "No," said Nasreddin. "Then you wasted half your life," said the professor. Nasreddin was silent for a little while. Then he said: "Can you swim?" "No," said the professor. "Then you wasted ALL of your life," said Nasreddin. "We are sinking."
    What according to the professor Nasreddin didn't do?

    A) Did not know to swim.

    B) Did not spell elephant correctly.

    C) Did not know the root of 9.

    D) Did not study at school.

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer25)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Nasreddin the Ferry Man
    Nasreddin once had an old boat, which he used to ferry people across the river. One day, he was taking a university professor to the other side. "What is the square root of 9?" asked the professor. "I don't know," answered Nasreddin. "How do you spell elephant?" asked the professor. "I have no idea/ replied Nasreddin. "Didn't you study anything at school?" demanded the professor, surprised. "No," said Nasreddin. "Then you wasted half your life," said the professor. Nasreddin was silent for a little while. Then he said: "Can you swim?" "No," said the professor. "Then you wasted ALL of your life," said Nasreddin. "We are sinking."
    What is the noun form of the verb surprised??

    A) Surprised

    B) surprise

    C) Surprise

    D) none

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer26)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Nasreddin the Ferry Man
    Nasreddin once had an old boat, which he used to ferry people across the river. One day, he was taking a university professor to the other side. "What is the square root of 9?" asked the professor. "I don't know," answered Nasreddin. "How do you spell elephant?" asked the professor. "I have no idea/ replied Nasreddin. "Didn't you study anything at school?" demanded the professor, surprised. "No," said Nasreddin. "Then you wasted half your life," said the professor. Nasreddin was silent for a little while. Then he said: "Can you swim?" "No," said the professor. "Then you wasted ALL of your life," said Nasreddin. "We are sinking."
    What may have happened at the end?

    A) The ferry sank.

    B) The professor swam ashore.

    C) Nasreddin joined school.

    D) The river flooded.

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer27)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Television - history and development
    Televisions show pictures with sounds. They get data from cables, discs, or over-the-air signals. They turn this data into sounds and images. People watch news and shows on them. You probably call them TVs for short. John Baird made the first TV in 1925. It had one color. It could only show 30 lines. This was just enough room for a face. It didn't work well, but it was a start. The first TV station was set up in 1928. It was in New York. Few people had TVs. The broadcasts were not meant to be watched. They showed a Felix the Cat doll' for two hours a day. The doll spun around on a record player. They were experimenting. It took many years to get it right. By the end of the 1930s, TVs were working well. America got its first taste at the 1939 World's Fair. This was one of the biggest events ever. There were 200 small, black and white TVs set up around the fair. The U.S. President gave a speech over the TVs. The TVs were only five inches big but the people loved it. They wanted TVs. But World War II was going on during this time. Factories were busy making guns and bombs. When the war was over, TV spread across the country. By 1948 there were 4 big TV networks in America. They aired their shows from 8 to 11 each night. Local shows were aired at other times. Most of the time, nothing was shown at all. TV was not 'always on7 like it is now. Colour TVs came out in 1953. They cost too much money for most. Also, shows were aired in black and white. By 1965, colour TVs were cheaper. TV stations started airing shows in colour. People had to switch if they wanted to see the shows. Now most TVs are high-def. This means that they have many lines on them. This makes the image clear. TVs have come a long way since Baird's 30-line set. High - def TVs have 1080 lines. There are state-of-the-art sets called 4K TVs. These TVs have 3,840 lines. Some people watch TV in 3D. I wonder what they will come up with next. Smell-o-vision anyone?
    When did colour TVs come out?

    A) 1925

    B) 1953

    C) 1939

    D) 1965

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer28)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Television - history and development
    Televisions show pictures with sounds. They get data from cables, discs, or over-the-air signals. They turn this data into sounds and images. People watch news and shows on them. You probably call them TVs for short. John Baird made the first TV in 1925. It had one color. It could only show 30 lines. This was just enough room for a face. It didn't work well, but it was a start. The first TV station was set up in 1928. It was in New York. Few people had TVs. The broadcasts were not meant to be watched. They showed a Felix the Cat doll' for two hours a day. The doll spun around on a record player. They were experimenting. It took many years to get it right. By the end of the 1930s, TVs were working well. America got its first taste at the 1939 World's Fair. This was one of the biggest events ever. There were 200 small, black and white TVs set up around the fair. The U.S. President gave a speech over the TVs. The TVs were only five inches big but the people loved it. They wanted TVs. But World War II was going on during this time. Factories were busy making guns and bombs. When the war was over, TV spread across the country. By 1948 there were 4 big TV networks in America. They aired their shows from 8 to 11 each night. Local shows were aired at other times. Most of the time, nothing was shown at all. TV was not 'always on7 like it is now. Colour TVs came out in 1953. They cost too much money for most. Also, shows were aired in black and white. By 1965, colour TVs were cheaper. TV stations started airing shows in colour. People had to switch if they wanted to see the shows. Now most TVs are high-def. This means that they have many lines on them. This makes the image clear. TVs have come a long way since Baird's 30-line set. High - def TVs have 1080 lines. There are state-of-the-art sets called 4K TVs. These TVs have 3,840 lines. Some people watch TV in 3D. I wonder what they will come up with next. Smell-o-vision anyone?
    Which was not true about the first TV?

    A) It could only show one colour.

    B) It only had 30 lines.

    C) It didn't have sound.

    D) It didn't work well.

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer29)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Television - history and development
    Televisions show pictures with sounds. They get data from cables, discs, or over-the-air signals. They turn this data into sounds and images. People watch news and shows on them. You probably call them TVs for short. John Baird made the first TV in 1925. It had one color. It could only show 30 lines. This was just enough room for a face. It didn't work well, but it was a start. The first TV station was set up in 1928. It was in New York. Few people had TVs. The broadcasts were not meant to be watched. They showed a Felix the Cat doll' for two hours a day. The doll spun around on a record player. They were experimenting. It took many years to get it right. By the end of the 1930s, TVs were working well. America got its first taste at the 1939 World's Fair. This was one of the biggest events ever. There were 200 small, black and white TVs set up around the fair. The U.S. President gave a speech over the TVs. The TVs were only five inches big but the people loved it. They wanted TVs. But World War II was going on during this time. Factories were busy making guns and bombs. When the war was over, TV spread across the country. By 1948 there were 4 big TV networks in America. They aired their shows from 8 to 11 each night. Local shows were aired at other times. Most of the time, nothing was shown at all. TV was not 'always on7 like it is now. Colour TVs came out in 1953. They cost too much money for most. Also, shows were aired in black and white. By 1965, colour TVs were cheaper. TV stations started airing shows in colour. People had to switch if they wanted to see the shows. Now most TVs are high-def. This means that they have many lines on them. This makes the image clear. TVs have come a long way since Baird's 30-line set. High - def TVs have 1080 lines. There are state-of-the-art sets called 4K TVs. These TVs have 3,840 lines. Some people watch TV in 3D. I wonder what they will come up with next. Smell-o-vision anyone?
    When did networks start showing programs in colour?

    A) 1948

    B) 1953

    C) 1965

    D) 1939

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer30)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Television - history and development
    Televisions show pictures with sounds. They get data from cables, discs, or over-the-air signals. They turn this data into sounds and images. People watch news and shows on them. You probably call them TVs for short. John Baird made the first TV in 1925. It had one color. It could only show 30 lines. This was just enough room for a face. It didn't work well, but it was a start. The first TV station was set up in 1928. It was in New York. Few people had TVs. The broadcasts were not meant to be watched. They showed a Felix the Cat doll' for two hours a day. The doll spun around on a record player. They were experimenting. It took many years to get it right. By the end of the 1930s, TVs were working well. America got its first taste at the 1939 World's Fair. This was one of the biggest events ever. There were 200 small, black and white TVs set up around the fair. The U.S. President gave a speech over the TVs. The TVs were only five inches big but the people loved it. They wanted TVs. But World War II was going on during this time. Factories were busy making guns and bombs. When the war was over, TV spread across the country. By 1948 there were 4 big TV networks in America. They aired their shows from 8 to 11 each night. Local shows were aired at other times. Most of the time, nothing was shown at all. TV was not 'always on7 like it is now. Colour TVs came out in 1953. They cost too much money for most. Also, shows were aired in black and white. By 1965, colour TVs were cheaper. TV stations started airing shows in colour. People had to switch if they wanted to see the shows. Now most TVs are high-def. This means that they have many lines on them. This makes the image clear. TVs have come a long way since Baird's 30-line set. High - def TVs have 1080 lines. There are state-of-the-art sets called 4K TVs. These TVs have 3,840 lines. Some people watch TV in 3D. I wonder what they will come up with next. Smell-o-vision anyone?
    Why did the first TV station only show Felix the Cat? for two hours a day?

    A) They were running tests.

    B) It was really popular.

    C) It had been a big radio star.

    D) It was the only show that they had.

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer31)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Television - history and development
    Televisions show pictures with sounds. They get data from cables, discs, or over-the-air signals. They turn this data into sounds and images. People watch news and shows on them. You probably call them TVs for short. John Baird made the first TV in 1925. It had one color. It could only show 30 lines. This was just enough room for a face. It didn't work well, but it was a start. The first TV station was set up in 1928. It was in New York. Few people had TVs. The broadcasts were not meant to be watched. They showed a Felix the Cat doll' for two hours a day. The doll spun around on a record player. They were experimenting. It took many years to get it right. By the end of the 1930s, TVs were working well. America got its first taste at the 1939 World's Fair. This was one of the biggest events ever. There were 200 small, black and white TVs set up around the fair. The U.S. President gave a speech over the TVs. The TVs were only five inches big but the people loved it. They wanted TVs. But World War II was going on during this time. Factories were busy making guns and bombs. When the war was over, TV spread across the country. By 1948 there were 4 big TV networks in America. They aired their shows from 8 to 11 each night. Local shows were aired at other times. Most of the time, nothing was shown at all. TV was not 'always on7 like it is now. Colour TVs came out in 1953. They cost too much money for most. Also, shows were aired in black and white. By 1965, colour TVs were cheaper. TV stations started airing shows in colour. People had to switch if they wanted to see the shows. Now most TVs are high-def. This means that they have many lines on them. This makes the image clear. TVs have come a long way since Baird's 30-line set. High - def TVs have 1080 lines. There are state-of-the-art sets called 4K TVs. These TVs have 3,840 lines. Some people watch TV in 3D. I wonder what they will come up with next. Smell-o-vision anyone?
    Which of these events slowed the spread of TVs?

    A) The world's fair of 1939

    B) The Civil War

    C) The election of the U.S. President.

    D) World War II

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer32)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Television - history and development
    Televisions show pictures with sounds. They get data from cables, discs, or over-the-air signals. They turn this data into sounds and images. People watch news and shows on them. You probably call them TVs for short. John Baird made the first TV in 1925. It had one color. It could only show 30 lines. This was just enough room for a face. It didn't work well, but it was a start. The first TV station was set up in 1928. It was in New York. Few people had TVs. The broadcasts were not meant to be watched. They showed a Felix the Cat doll' for two hours a day. The doll spun around on a record player. They were experimenting. It took many years to get it right. By the end of the 1930s, TVs were working well. America got its first taste at the 1939 World's Fair. This was one of the biggest events ever. There were 200 small, black and white TVs set up around the fair. The U.S. President gave a speech over the TVs. The TVs were only five inches big but the people loved it. They wanted TVs. But World War II was going on during this time. Factories were busy making guns and bombs. When the war was over, TV spread across the country. By 1948 there were 4 big TV networks in America. They aired their shows from 8 to 11 each night. Local shows were aired at other times. Most of the time, nothing was shown at all. TV was not 'always on7 like it is now. Colour TVs came out in 1953. They cost too much money for most. Also, shows were aired in black and white. By 1965, colour TVs were cheaper. TV stations started airing shows in colour. People had to switch if they wanted to see the shows. Now most TVs are high-def. This means that they have many lines on them. This makes the image clear. TVs have come a long way since Baird's 30-line set. High - def TVs have 1080 lines. There are state-of-the-art sets called 4K TVs. These TVs have 3,840 lines. Some people watch TV in 3D. I wonder what they will come up with next. Smell-o-vision anyone?
    What is the author's main purpose in writing this?

    A) He is trying to explain how a TV works.

    B) He is telling readers how TVs became popular.

    C) He is describing the history and development of TV.

    D) He is trying to get people watch TV.

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer33)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Television - history and development
    Televisions show pictures with sounds. They get data from cables, discs, or over-the-air signals. They turn this data into sounds and images. People watch news and shows on them. You probably call them TVs for short. John Baird made the first TV in 1925. It had one color. It could only show 30 lines. This was just enough room for a face. It didn't work well, but it was a start. The first TV station was set up in 1928. It was in New York. Few people had TVs. The broadcasts were not meant to be watched. They showed a Felix the Cat doll' for two hours a day. The doll spun around on a record player. They were experimenting. It took many years to get it right. By the end of the 1930s, TVs were working well. America got its first taste at the 1939 World's Fair. This was one of the biggest events ever. There were 200 small, black and white TVs set up around the fair. The U.S. President gave a speech over the TVs. The TVs were only five inches big but the people loved it. They wanted TVs. But World War II was going on during this time. Factories were busy making guns and bombs. When the war was over, TV spread across the country. By 1948 there were 4 big TV networks in America. They aired their shows from 8 to 11 each night. Local shows were aired at other times. Most of the time, nothing was shown at all. TV was not 'always on7 like it is now. Colour TVs came out in 1953. They cost too much money for most. Also, shows were aired in black and white. By 1965, colour TVs were cheaper. TV stations started airing shows in colour. People had to switch if they wanted to see the shows. Now most TVs are high-def. This means that they have many lines on them. This makes the image clear. TVs have come a long way since Baird's 30-line set. High - def TVs have 1080 lines. There are state-of-the-art sets called 4K TVs. These TVs have 3,840 lines. Some people watch TV in 3D. I wonder what they will come up with next. Smell-o-vision anyone?
    Why did many families switch to colour TVs in 1965?

    A) Colour TVs became cheaper.

    B) Many shows were only shown in colour.

    C) Colour TVs came out in 1965.

    D) World War II ended.

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer34)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Television - history and development
    Televisions show pictures with sounds. They get data from cables, discs, or over-the-air signals. They turn this data into sounds and images. People watch news and shows on them. You probably call them TVs for short. John Baird made the first TV in 1925. It had one color. It could only show 30 lines. This was just enough room for a face. It didn't work well, but it was a start. The first TV station was set up in 1928. It was in New York. Few people had TVs. The broadcasts were not meant to be watched. They showed a Felix the Cat doll' for two hours a day. The doll spun around on a record player. They were experimenting. It took many years to get it right. By the end of the 1930s, TVs were working well. America got its first taste at the 1939 World's Fair. This was one of the biggest events ever. There were 200 small, black and white TVs set up around the fair. The U.S. President gave a speech over the TVs. The TVs were only five inches big but the people loved it. They wanted TVs. But World War II was going on during this time. Factories were busy making guns and bombs. When the war was over, TV spread across the country. By 1948 there were 4 big TV networks in America. They aired their shows from 8 to 11 each night. Local shows were aired at other times. Most of the time, nothing was shown at all. TV was not 'always on7 like it is now. Colour TVs came out in 1953. They cost too much money for most. Also, shows were aired in black and white. By 1965, colour TVs were cheaper. TV stations started airing shows in colour. People had to switch if they wanted to see the shows. Now most TVs are high-def. This means that they have many lines on them. This makes the image clear. TVs have come a long way since Baird's 30-line set. High - def TVs have 1080 lines. There are state-of-the-art sets called 4K TVs. These TVs have 3,840 lines. Some people watch TV in 3D. I wonder what they will come up with next. Smell-o-vision anyone?
    Why was 1939 an important year for TV?

    A) Many Americans were introduced to TV.

    B) The first colour TV was released.

    C) The first TV station began broadcasting.

    D) John Baird created the first TV.

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer35)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Television - history and development
    Televisions show pictures with sounds. They get data from cables, discs, or over-the-air signals. They turn this data into sounds and images. People watch news and shows on them. You probably call them TVs for short. John Baird made the first TV in 1925. It had one color. It could only show 30 lines. This was just enough room for a face. It didn't work well, but it was a start. The first TV station was set up in 1928. It was in New York. Few people had TVs. The broadcasts were not meant to be watched. They showed a Felix the Cat doll' for two hours a day. The doll spun around on a record player. They were experimenting. It took many years to get it right. By the end of the 1930s, TVs were working well. America got its first taste at the 1939 World's Fair. This was one of the biggest events ever. There were 200 small, black and white TVs set up around the fair. The U.S. President gave a speech over the TVs. The TVs were only five inches big but the people loved it. They wanted TVs. But World War II was going on during this time. Factories were busy making guns and bombs. When the war was over, TV spread across the country. By 1948 there were 4 big TV networks in America. They aired their shows from 8 to 11 each night. Local shows were aired at other times. Most of the time, nothing was shown at all. TV was not 'always on7 like it is now. Colour TVs came out in 1953. They cost too much money for most. Also, shows were aired in black and white. By 1965, colour TVs were cheaper. TV stations started airing shows in colour. People had to switch if they wanted to see the shows. Now most TVs are high-def. This means that they have many lines on them. This makes the image clear. TVs have come a long way since Baird's 30-line set. High - def TVs have 1080 lines. There are state-of-the-art sets called 4K TVs. These TVs have 3,840 lines. Some people watch TV in 3D. I wonder what they will come up with next. Smell-o-vision anyone?
    How many lines does a 4K TV have?

    A) 30

    B) 1080

    C) 4000

    D) 3840

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  • question_answer36)

    Read the following passages and select correct options to answer the questions that follow.
    Television - history and development
    Televisions show pictures with sounds. They get data from cables, discs, or over-the-air signals. They turn this data into sounds and images. People watch news and shows on them. You probably call them TVs for short. John Baird made the first TV in 1925. It had one color. It could only show 30 lines. This was just enough room for a face. It didn't work well, but it was a start. The first TV station was set up in 1928. It was in New York. Few people had TVs. The broadcasts were not meant to be watched. They showed a Felix the Cat doll' for two hours a day. The doll spun around on a record player. They were experimenting. It took many years to get it right. By the end of the 1930s, TVs were working well. America got its first taste at the 1939 World's Fair. This was one of the biggest events ever. There were 200 small, black and white TVs set up around the fair. The U.S. President gave a speech over the TVs. The TVs were only five inches big but the people loved it. They wanted TVs. But World War II was going on during this time. Factories were busy making guns and bombs. When the war was over, TV spread across the country. By 1948 there were 4 big TV networks in America. They aired their shows from 8 to 11 each night. Local shows were aired at other times. Most of the time, nothing was shown at all. TV was not 'always on7 like it is now. Colour TVs came out in 1953. They cost too much money for most. Also, shows were aired in black and white. By 1965, colour TVs were cheaper. TV stations started airing shows in colour. People had to switch if they wanted to see the shows. Now most TVs are high-def. This means that they have many lines on them. This makes the image clear. TVs have come a long way since Baird's 30-line set. High - def TVs have 1080 lines. There are state-of-the-art sets called 4K TVs. These TVs have 3,840 lines. Some people watch TV in 3D. I wonder what they will come up with next. Smell-o-vision anyone?
    Which happened first?

    A) The 1939 World's Fair.

    B) The release of high-def TVs.

    C) The end of World War II.

    D) The release of colour TVs.

    View Solution play_arrow


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