7th Class English Comprehension (Prose and Poetry) Question Bank

done Comprehension Prose and Poetry

Question Bank
  • question_answer1)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    A donkey and a rooster lived peaceably together in the farmyard One day, a hungry lion passed by. His eyes brightened at the sight of the plump donkey, and he thought of the fine meal in store for him. But just as the lion was about to pounce on the donkey, the rooster began to crow. Now, it is said there is nothing a lion hates more than the sound of a cock-a-doodle-doo. Perhaps it is true, for the lion turned and fled at the sound of the rooster's crowing.
    The donkey laughed "Why, the lion is a coward! The mighty king of beasts runs from a rooster." And the donkey felt so bold that he began to chase the lion. He had not gone very far, however, when the lion turned with a great roar, he leapt upon the donkey.
    The rooster, watching from the farmyard, said sadly, "Alas! My poor friend did not realize what he could or could not do."
    "False confidence often leads to misfortune."
    Why did the eyes of the hungry lion shine?

    A) To see the rooster      

    B) When he saw the healthy donkey.  

    C) When he saw the friendship of the rooster and the donkey.   

    D) None of the above.    

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  • question_answer2)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    A donkey and a rooster lived peaceably together in the farmyard One day, a hungry lion passed by. His eyes brightened at the sight of the plump donkey, and he thought of the fine meal in store for him. But just as the lion was about to pounce on the donkey, the rooster began to crow. Now, it is said there is nothing a lion hates more than the sound of a cock-a-doodle-doo. Perhaps it is true, for the lion turned and fled at the sound of the rooster's crowing.
    The donkey laughed "Why, the lion is a coward! The mighty king of beasts runs from a rooster." And the donkey felt so bold that he began to chase the lion. He had not gone very far, however, when the lion turned with a great roar, he leapt upon the donkey.
    The rooster, watching from the farmyard, said sadly, "Alas! My poor friend did not realize what he could or could not do."
    "False confidence often leads to misfortune."
    Why did the lion run away?    

    A) The lion was afraid of the donkey.     

    B) The lion hated the crow,        

    C) The lion hated the crowing of the rooster  

    D) None of the above.    

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  • question_answer3)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    A donkey and a rooster lived peaceably together in the farmyard One day, a hungry lion passed by. His eyes brightened at the sight of the plump donkey, and he thought of the fine meal in store for him. But just as the lion was about to pounce on the donkey, the rooster began to crow. Now, it is said there is nothing a lion hates more than the sound of a cock-a-doodle-doo. Perhaps it is true, for the lion turned and fled at the sound of the rooster's crowing.
    The donkey laughed "Why, the lion is a coward! The mighty king of beasts runs from a rooster." And the donkey felt so bold that he began to chase the lion. He had not gone very far, however, when the lion turned with a great roar, he leapt upon the donkey.
    The rooster, watching from the farmyard, said sadly, "Alas! My poor friend did not realize what he could or could not do."
    "False confidence often leads to misfortune."
    Why did the donkey chase the lion?    

    A) He wanted to kill the lion.

    B) He was confident to kill the lion.

    C) He had false confidence to kill the lion.  

    D) None of these

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  • question_answer4)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    A donkey and a rooster lived peaceably together in the farmyard One day, a hungry lion passed by. His eyes brightened at the sight of the plump donkey, and he thought of the fine meal in store for him. But just as the lion was about to pounce on the donkey, the rooster began to crow. Now, it is said there is nothing a lion hates more than the sound of a cock-a-doodle-doo. Perhaps it is true, for the lion turned and fled at the sound of the rooster's crowing.
    The donkey laughed "Why, the lion is a coward! The mighty king of beasts runs from a rooster." And the donkey felt so bold that he began to chase the lion. He had not gone very far, however, when the lion turned with a great roar, he leapt upon the donkey.
    The rooster, watching from the farmyard, said sadly, "Alas! My poor friend did not realize what he could or could not do."
    "False confidence often leads to misfortune."
    The rooster became sad in the end because _____.

    A) the rooster could not crow,

    B) the lion had killed his friend, donkey  

    C) the lion had run away

    D) none of the above

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  • question_answer5)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    A donkey and a rooster lived peaceably together in the farmyard One day, a hungry lion passed by. His eyes brightened at the sight of the plump donkey, and he thought of the fine meal in store for him. But just as the lion was about to pounce on the donkey, the rooster began to crow. Now, it is said there is nothing a lion hates more than the sound of a cock-a-doodle-doo. Perhaps it is true, for the lion turned and fled at the sound of the rooster's crowing.
    The donkey laughed "Why, the lion is a coward! The mighty king of beasts runs from a rooster." And the donkey felt so bold that he began to chase the lion. He had not gone very far, however, when the lion turned with a great roar, he leapt upon the donkey.
    The rooster, watching from the farmyard, said sadly, "Alas! My poor friend did not realize what he could or could not do."
    "False confidence often leads to misfortune."
    Which word in the passage mean 'jumped'?

    A) Fled               

    B) Chased

    C) Crowing         

    D) Leapt  

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  • question_answer6)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    In the middle of the big river, the river that began in the mountains and ended in the sea, was a small island. The river swept round the island, sometimes clawing at banks, but never going right over it. A small hut stood on the island, a mud-walled hut with a sloping thatched roof. The hut had been built into a huge rock, so only three of the walls were mud, and the fourth was rock.
    A few goats grazed on the short grass which grew on the island. Some hens followed them about. There was a melon patch and a vegetable patch.
    In the middle of the island stood a peepal tree. It was on old tree. Many years ago, a seed had been carried to the island by a strong wind, had found shelter between two rocks, had taken root there, and had sprung up to give shade and shelter to a small family.
    Grandfather was mending a fishing-net. He had fished in the river for ten years, and he was a good fisherman. He knew where to find the slim silver chilwa, the big beautiful mahseer and the long moustached singhara; he knew where the river was deep and where it was shallow; he knew which baits to use - which fish liked worms and which liked gram. He had taught his son to fish, but his son had gone to work in a factory in a city, nearly a hundred miles away. He had no grandson; but he had a granddaughter, Sita, and she could do them better. She had lost her mother when she was very small. Grandmother had taught her all the things a girl should know. But neither of her grandparents could read or write, and as a result Sita couldn't read or write either.
    Where was the island situated?

    A) In the middle of the mountains.

    B) In the sea.

    C) In the middle of the big river.  

    D) Near the banks of the river.

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  • question_answer7)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    In the middle of the big river, the river that began in the mountains and ended in the sea, was a small island. The river swept round the island, sometimes clawing at banks, but never going right over it. A small hut stood on the island, a mud-walled hut with a sloping thatched roof. The hut had been built into a huge rock, so only three of the walls were mud, and the fourth was rock.
    A few goats grazed on the short grass which grew on the island. Some hens followed them about. There was a melon patch and a vegetable patch.
    In the middle of the island stood a peepal tree. It was on old tree. Many years ago, a seed had been carried to the island by a strong wind, had found shelter between two rocks, had taken root there, and had sprung up to give shade and shelter to a small family.
    Grandfather was mending a fishing-net. He had fished in the river for ten years, and he was a good fisherman. He knew where to find the slim silver chilwa, the big beautiful mahseer and the long moustached singhara; he knew where the river was deep and where it was shallow; he knew which baits to use - which fish liked worms and which liked gram. He had taught his son to fish, but his son had gone to work in a factory in a city, nearly a hundred miles away. He had no grandson; but he had a granddaughter, Sita, and she could do them better. She had lost her mother when she was very small. Grandmother had taught her all the things a girl should know. But neither of her grandparents could read or write, and as a result Sita couldn't read or write either.
    How had the peepal tree grown between two rocks?

    A) The tree had broken a big rock and divided into two.

    B) The seed of peepal was carried by wind and grew between two rocks.  

    C) It was grown there by a small family.

    D) None of these

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  • question_answer8)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    In the middle of the big river, the river that began in the mountains and ended in the sea, was a small island. The river swept round the island, sometimes clawing at banks, but never going right over it. A small hut stood on the island, a mud-walled hut with a sloping thatched roof. The hut had been built into a huge rock, so only three of the walls were mud, and the fourth was rock.
    A few goats grazed on the short grass which grew on the island. Some hens followed them about. There was a melon patch and a vegetable patch.
    In the middle of the island stood a peepal tree. It was on old tree. Many years ago, a seed had been carried to the island by a strong wind, had found shelter between two rocks, had taken root there, and had sprung up to give shade and shelter to a small family.
    Grandfather was mending a fishing-net. He had fished in the river for ten years, and he was a good fisherman. He knew where to find the slim silver chilwa, the big beautiful mahseer and the long moustached singhara; he knew where the river was deep and where it was shallow; he knew which baits to use - which fish liked worms and which liked gram. He had taught his son to fish, but his son had gone to work in a factory in a city, nearly a hundred miles away. He had no grandson; but he had a granddaughter, Sita, and she could do them better. She had lost her mother when she was very small. Grandmother had taught her all the things a girl should know. But neither of her grandparents could read or write, and as a result Sita couldn't read or write either.
    What are 'chilwa', 'mahseer' and 'singhara'?

    A) Kinds of fish     

    B) Names of goats

    C) Names of hens           

    D) Names of children

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  • question_answer9)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    In the middle of the big river, the river that began in the mountains and ended in the sea, was a small island. The river swept round the island, sometimes clawing at banks, but never going right over it. A small hut stood on the island, a mud-walled hut with a sloping thatched roof. The hut had been built into a huge rock, so only three of the walls were mud, and the fourth was rock.
    A few goats grazed on the short grass which grew on the island. Some hens followed them about. There was a melon patch and a vegetable patch.
    In the middle of the island stood a peepal tree. It was on old tree. Many years ago, a seed had been carried to the island by a strong wind, had found shelter between two rocks, had taken root there, and had sprung up to give shade and shelter to a small family.
    Grandfather was mending a fishing-net. He had fished in the river for ten years, and he was a good fisherman. He knew where to find the slim silver chilwa, the big beautiful mahseer and the long moustached singhara; he knew where the river was deep and where it was shallow; he knew which baits to use - which fish liked worms and which liked gram. He had taught his son to fish, but his son had gone to work in a factory in a city, nearly a hundred miles away. He had no grandson; but he had a granddaughter, Sita, and she could do them better. She had lost her mother when she was very small. Grandmother had taught her all the things a girl should know. But neither of her grandparents could read or write, and as a result Sita couldn't read or write either.
    Sita could not read or write because ___.

    A) she lived alone on the island

    B) there was no school on the island

    C) she lived with her grandparents, who  could not read and write  

    D) she could not see

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  • question_answer10)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    Once upon a time, a miller and his young son were going along a road. They had their ass with them. Hardly had they covered a few metres when they came across a person who laughed and said, "How foolish both of you are! Can't one of you ride on the ass?" Hearing this, the son rode on the animal, and the father walked along.
    About two hundred metres away, they met an old man who said, "Look at this shameless youngster! He is merrily riding on the ass, while his father is trudging his way." This was enough for the boy to get off the animal. Now, the miller himself rode on it. After five minutes, they met another man who made fun of the old man, saying, "Look at the old man! He's too selfish to think of the young boy." These stinging words made the poor miller get off the ass.
    Now, the father and the son tied the ass to two poles with the help of ropes. They carried the animal on their shoulders, to the great amusement of the passers-by. As they were crossing a bridge over a river, the ass got impatient. It kicked itself free, but was drowned in the deep water.
    The first person laughed at the miller and his son because _____.

    A) both of them were going with a donkey

    B) neither of them was using the ass for a ride  

    C) the ass was looking funny

    D) none of the above

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  • question_answer11)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    Once upon a time, a miller and his young son were going along a road. They had their ass with them. Hardly had they covered a few metres when they came across a person who laughed and said, "How foolish both of you are! Can't one of you ride on the ass?" Hearing this, the son rode on the animal, and the father walked along.
    About two hundred metres away, they met an old man who said, "Look at this shameless youngster! He is merrily riding on the ass, while his father is trudging his way." This was enough for the boy to get off the animal. Now, the miller himself rode on it. After five minutes, they met another man who made fun of the old man, saying, "Look at the old man! He's too selfish to think of the young boy." These stinging words made the poor miller get off the ass.
    Now, the father and the son tied the ass to two poles with the help of ropes. They carried the animal on their shoulders, to the great amusement of the passers-by. As they were crossing a bridge over a river, the ass got impatient. It kicked itself free, but was drowned in the deep water.
    What did the old man comment?

    A) He condemned the father for letting the little boy walk on the road

    B) He condemned the young boy for riding the ass.  

    C) He criticised both the father and the son.

    D) He commented on the ill - health of the ass.

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  • question_answer12)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    Once upon a time, a miller and his young son were going along a road. They had their ass with them. Hardly had they covered a few metres when they came across a person who laughed and said, "How foolish both of you are! Can't one of you ride on the ass?" Hearing this, the son rode on the animal, and the father walked along.
    About two hundred metres away, they met an old man who said, "Look at this shameless youngster! He is merrily riding on the ass, while his father is trudging his way." This was enough for the boy to get off the animal. Now, the miller himself rode on it. After five minutes, they met another man who made fun of the old man, saying, "Look at the old man! He's too selfish to think of the young boy." These stinging words made the poor miller get off the ass.
    Now, the father and the son tied the ass to two poles with the help of ropes. They carried the animal on their shoulders, to the great amusement of the passers-by. As they were crossing a bridge over a river, the ass got impatient. It kicked itself free, but was drowned in the deep water.
    Which step was taken by the two in the end?

    A) They left the ass on the way.

    B) They sold the ass.

    C) They carried the ass on their shoulders.  

    D) They drowned the ass into the river.

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  • question_answer13)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    Once upon a time, a miller and his young son were going along a road. They had their ass with them. Hardly had they covered a few metres when they came across a person who laughed and said, "How foolish both of you are! Can't one of you ride on the ass?" Hearing this, the son rode on the animal, and the father walked along.
    About two hundred metres away, they met an old man who said, "Look at this shameless youngster! He is merrily riding on the ass, while his father is trudging his way." This was enough for the boy to get off the animal. Now, the miller himself rode on it. After five minutes, they met another man who made fun of the old man, saying, "Look at the old man! He's too selfish to think of the young boy." These stinging words made the poor miller get off the ass.
    Now, the father and the son tied the ass to two poles with the help of ropes. They carried the animal on their shoulders, to the great amusement of the passers-by. As they were crossing a bridge over a river, the ass got impatient. It kicked itself free, but was drowned in the deep water.
    Select the suitable title for the passage.

    A) 'A Ride on the Ass'

    B) 'Two men and an Ass'

    C) 'You cannot Please Everyone'  

    D) 'The Drowning of the Ass'

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  • question_answer14)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    Once upon a time, a miller and his young son were going along a road. They had their ass with them. Hardly had they covered a few metres when they came across a person who laughed and said, "How foolish both of you are! Can't one of you ride on the ass?" Hearing this, the son rode on the animal, and the father walked along.
    About two hundred metres away, they met an old man who said, "Look at this shameless youngster! He is merrily riding on the ass, while his father is trudging his way." This was enough for the boy to get off the animal. Now, the miller himself rode on it. After five minutes, they met another man who made fun of the old man, saying, "Look at the old man! He's too selfish to think of the young boy." These stinging words made the poor miller get off the ass.
    Now, the father and the son tied the ass to two poles with the help of ropes. They carried the animal on their shoulders, to the great amusement of the passers-by. As they were crossing a bridge over a river, the ass got impatient. It kicked itself free, but was drowned in the deep water.
    Which of the following word means 'walking slowly with heavy steps'?

    A) Going            

    B) Trudging  

    C) Crossing                    

    D) Drowned

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  • question_answer15)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    Once there was a miser who sold all his possessions and, with the money, bought a great lump of gold He dug a deep hole at the edge of the garden, and there he buried his gold Once a day, thereafter, the miser went to the garden, dug up his gold, and embraced it lovingly.
    One of the miser's workmen wondered why his master spent so much time in the garden. One day, he hid behind a tree and soon discovered the secret of the hidden treasure.
    That night, when the miser was fast asleep, the workman crept into the garden and stole the lump of gold.
    When the miser found that his gold was gone, he tore his hair and cried aloud in his despair. A neighbour came running to see what was the matter, and the grief-stricken miser told him what had happened.
    Then the neighbour said, "Pray stop your weeping. Go and find a stone. Place the stone in the hole and imagine that it is your lump of gold The stone will serve your purpose, for you never meant to use the gold anyway."
    "To a miser, what he has is of no more use than what he has not."
    How did the miser get the lump of gold?

    A) By selling all he had  

    B) By digging in his garden.

    C) From his ancestors.

    D) From his neighbour.

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  • question_answer16)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    Once there was a miser who sold all his possessions and, with the money, bought a great lump of gold He dug a deep hole at the edge of the garden, and there he buried his gold Once a day, thereafter, the miser went to the garden, dug up his gold, and embraced it lovingly.
    One of the miser's workmen wondered why his master spent so much time in the garden. One day, he hid behind a tree and soon discovered the secret of the hidden treasure.
    That night, when the miser was fast asleep, the workman crept into the garden and stole the lump of gold.
    When the miser found that his gold was gone, he tore his hair and cried aloud in his despair. A neighbour came running to see what was the matter, and the grief-stricken miser told him what had happened.
    Then the neighbour said, "Pray stop your weeping. Go and find a stone. Place the stone in the hole and imagine that it is your lump of gold The stone will serve your purpose, for you never meant to use the gold anyway."
    "To a miser, what he has is of no more use than what he has not."
    Why did the miser spend so much time in the garden?

    A) He was fond of flowers.

    B) He used to guard the hidden gold

    C) He used to touch his gold lovingly.  

    D) He used to dig up a new hole daily.

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  • question_answer17)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    Once there was a miser who sold all his possessions and, with the money, bought a great lump of gold He dug a deep hole at the edge of the garden, and there he buried his gold Once a day, thereafter, the miser went to the garden, dug up his gold, and embraced it lovingly.
    One of the miser's workmen wondered why his master spent so much time in the garden. One day, he hid behind a tree and soon discovered the secret of the hidden treasure.
    That night, when the miser was fast asleep, the workman crept into the garden and stole the lump of gold.
    When the miser found that his gold was gone, he tore his hair and cried aloud in his despair. A neighbour came running to see what was the matter, and the grief-stricken miser told him what had happened.
    Then the neighbour said, "Pray stop your weeping. Go and find a stone. Place the stone in the hole and imagine that it is your lump of gold The stone will serve your purpose, for you never meant to use the gold anyway."
    "To a miser, what he has is of no more use than what he has not."
    How was the gold stolen and by whom?

    A) The miser's workman discovered the secret and stole the gold in the night.  

    B) A thief came there and stole the lump of gold in the night.

    C) The neighbour stole it.

    D) None of the above.

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  • question_answer18)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    Once there was a miser who sold all his possessions and, with the money, bought a great lump of gold He dug a deep hole at the edge of the garden, and there he buried his gold Once a day, thereafter, the miser went to the garden, dug up his gold, and embraced it lovingly.
    One of the miser's workmen wondered why his master spent so much time in the garden. One day, he hid behind a tree and soon discovered the secret of the hidden treasure.
    That night, when the miser was fast asleep, the workman crept into the garden and stole the lump of gold.
    When the miser found that his gold was gone, he tore his hair and cried aloud in his despair. A neighbour came running to see what was the matter, and the grief-stricken miser told him what had happened.
    Then the neighbour said, "Pray stop your weeping. Go and find a stone. Place the stone in the hole and imagine that it is your lump of gold The stone will serve your purpose, for you never meant to use the gold anyway."
    "To a miser, what he has is of no more use than what he has not."
    The neighbour advised the miser to put a stone in the hole because _______.

    A) gold is like a stone only

    B) the miser would never use the gold hence no difference between the two  

    C) the stone will become gold after some time

    D) for a wise man gold and stone have equal worth

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  • question_answer19)

    Read the following stories and answer the questions that follow:
    Once there was a miser who sold all his possessions and, with the money, bought a great lump of gold He dug a deep hole at the edge of the garden, and there he buried his gold Once a day, thereafter, the miser went to the garden, dug up his gold, and embraced it lovingly.
    One of the miser's workmen wondered why his master spent so much time in the garden. One day, he hid behind a tree and soon discovered the secret of the hidden treasure.
    That night, when the miser was fast asleep, the workman crept into the garden and stole the lump of gold.
    When the miser found that his gold was gone, he tore his hair and cried aloud in his despair. A neighbour came running to see what was the matter, and the grief-stricken miser told him what had happened.
    Then the neighbour said, "Pray stop your weeping. Go and find a stone. Place the stone in the hole and imagine that it is your lump of gold The stone will serve your purpose, for you never meant to use the gold anyway."
    "To a miser, what he has is of no more use than what he has not."
    Choose the most appropriate title for this story.

    A) 'Gold and Stone'

    B) 'The Miser and His Gold'  

    C) 'The Miser and His Neighbour'

    D) 'The Miser and His workman'

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  • question_answer20)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    No Men are Foreign
    Remember, no men are strange, no countries foreign
    Beneath all uniforms, a single body breathes
    Like ours: the land our brothers walk upon
    Is earth like this, in which we all shall lie.
    They, too, aware of sun and air and water,
    Are fed by peaceful harvests, by war's long winter starv'd
    Their hands are ours, and in their lines we read
    A labour not different from our own.
    Remember, they have eyes like ours that wake
    Or sleep, and strength that can be won
    By love. In every land is common life
    That all can recognise and understand.
    Let us remember, whenever we are told
    To hate our brothers, it is ourselves
    That we shall dispossess, betray, condemn.
    Remember, we who take arms against each other It is the human earth that we defile.
    Our hells of fire and dust outrage the innocence
    Of air that is everywhere our own,
    Remember, no men are foreign, and no countries strange.
      Focusing on the theme of world fraternity the poet says that _______.

    A) no men are strange  

    B) no men are corrupt

    C) no men are simple

    D) all men are kind

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  • question_answer21)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    No Men are Foreign
    Remember, no men are strange, no countries foreign
    Beneath all uniforms, a single body breathes
    Like ours: the land our brothers walk upon
    Is earth like this, in which we all shall lie.
    They, too, aware of sun and air and water,
    Are fed by peaceful harvests, by war's long winter starv'd
    Their hands are ours, and in their lines we read
    A labour not different from our own.
    Remember, they have eyes like ours that wake
    Or sleep, and strength that can be won
    By love. In every land is common life
    That all can recognise and understand.
    Let us remember, whenever we are told
    To hate our brothers, it is ourselves
    That we shall dispossess, betray, condemn.
    Remember, we who take arms against each other It is the human earth that we defile.
    Our hells of fire and dust outrage the innocence
    Of air that is everywhere our own,
    Remember, no men are foreign, and no countries strange.
    Everyone on the earth gets comfort from the same ______.

    A) air                  

    B) water

    C) sun                

    D) all are correct  

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  • question_answer22)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    No Men are Foreign
    Remember, no men are strange, no countries foreign
    Beneath all uniforms, a single body breathes
    Like ours: the land our brothers walk upon
    Is earth like this, in which we all shall lie.
    They, too, aware of sun and air and water,
    Are fed by peaceful harvests, by war's long winter starv'd
    Their hands are ours, and in their lines we read
    A labour not different from our own.
    Remember, they have eyes like ours that wake
    Or sleep, and strength that can be won
    By love. In every land is common life
    That all can recognise and understand.
    Let us remember, whenever we are told
    To hate our brothers, it is ourselves
    That we shall dispossess, betray, condemn.
    Remember, we who take arms against each other It is the human earth that we defile.
    Our hells of fire and dust outrage the innocence
    Of air that is everywhere our own,
    Remember, no men are foreign, and no countries strange.
    All the people in the world work

    A) with same name        

    B) at same place

    C) in same style              

    D) with same effort  

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  • question_answer23)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    No Men are Foreign
    Remember, no men are strange, no countries foreign
    Beneath all uniforms, a single body breathes
    Like ours: the land our brothers walk upon
    Is earth like this, in which we all shall lie.
    They, too, aware of sun and air and water,
    Are fed by peaceful harvests, by war's long winter starv'd
    Their hands are ours, and in their lines we read
    A labour not different from our own.
    Remember, they have eyes like ours that wake
    Or sleep, and strength that can be won
    By love. In every land is common life
    That all can recognise and understand.
    Let us remember, whenever we are told
    To hate our brothers, it is ourselves
    That we shall dispossess, betray, condemn.
    Remember, we who take arms against each other It is the human earth that we defile.
    Our hells of fire and dust outrage the innocence
    Of air that is everywhere our own,
    Remember, no men are foreign, and no countries strange.
    If we hate our brothers, we hate

    A) our brothers               

    B) our enemies

    C) ourselves  

    D) all of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer24)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    No Men are Foreign
    Remember, no men are strange, no countries foreign
    Beneath all uniforms, a single body breathes
    Like ours: the land our brothers walk upon
    Is earth like this, in which we all shall lie.
    They, too, aware of sun and air and water,
    Are fed by peaceful harvests, by war's long winter starv'd
    Their hands are ours, and in their lines we read
    A labour not different from our own.
    Remember, they have eyes like ours that wake
    Or sleep, and strength that can be won
    By love. In every land is common life
    That all can recognise and understand.
    Let us remember, whenever we are told
    To hate our brothers, it is ourselves
    That we shall dispossess, betray, condemn.
    Remember, we who take arms against each other It is the human earth that we defile.
    Our hells of fire and dust outrage the innocence
    Of air that is everywhere our own,
    Remember, no men are foreign, and no countries strange.
    The poet wants to say that life is ______ anywhere.

    A) different         

    B) common  

    C) difficult          

    D) comfortable

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer25)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    No Men are Foreign
    Remember, no men are strange, no countries foreign
    Beneath all uniforms, a single body breathes
    Like ours: the land our brothers walk upon
    Is earth like this, in which we all shall lie.
    They, too, aware of sun and air and water,
    Are fed by peaceful harvests, by war's long winter starv'd
    Their hands are ours, and in their lines we read
    A labour not different from our own.
    Remember, they have eyes like ours that wake
    Or sleep, and strength that can be won
    By love. In every land is common life
    That all can recognise and understand.
    Let us remember, whenever we are told
    To hate our brothers, it is ourselves
    That we shall dispossess, betray, condemn.
    Remember, we who take arms against each other It is the human earth that we defile.
    Our hells of fire and dust outrage the innocence
    Of air that is everywhere our own,
    Remember, no men are foreign, and no countries strange.
    By betraying someone we ______.

    A) defile our earth

    B) betray ourselves  

    C) honour our earth

    D) spread humanity on earth

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer26)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    No Men are Foreign
    Remember, no men are strange, no countries foreign
    Beneath all uniforms, a single body breathes
    Like ours: the land our brothers walk upon
    Is earth like this, in which we all shall lie.
    They, too, aware of sun and air and water,
    Are fed by peaceful harvests, by war's long winter starv'd
    Their hands are ours, and in their lines we read
    A labour not different from our own.
    Remember, they have eyes like ours that wake
    Or sleep, and strength that can be won
    By love. In every land is common life
    That all can recognise and understand.
    Let us remember, whenever we are told
    To hate our brothers, it is ourselves
    That we shall dispossess, betray, condemn.
    Remember, we who take arms against each other It is the human earth that we defile.
    Our hells of fire and dust outrage the innocence
    Of air that is everywhere our own,
    Remember, no men are foreign, and no countries strange.
    The word "outrage" here means ____.

    A) protect           

    B) defame

    C) spoil                 

    D) complain

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer27)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    No Men are Foreign
    Remember, no men are strange, no countries foreign
    Beneath all uniforms, a single body breathes
    Like ours: the land our brothers walk upon
    Is earth like this, in which we all shall lie.
    They, too, aware of sun and air and water,
    Are fed by peaceful harvests, by war's long winter starv'd
    Their hands are ours, and in their lines we read
    A labour not different from our own.
    Remember, they have eyes like ours that wake
    Or sleep, and strength that can be won
    By love. In every land is common life
    That all can recognise and understand.
    Let us remember, whenever we are told
    To hate our brothers, it is ourselves
    That we shall dispossess, betray, condemn.
    Remember, we who take arms against each other It is the human earth that we defile.
    Our hells of fire and dust outrage the innocence
    Of air that is everywhere our own,
    Remember, no men are foreign, and no countries strange.
    What does the poet want us to remember?

    A) We are human beings.

    B) We are mortal.

    C) No men are foreign, no countries strange.  

    D) All men are similar.

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer28)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    The Coromandel Fishers
    Rise, brothers, rise; the wakening skies pray to the morning light,
    The wind lies asleep in the arms of the dawn like a child that has cried all night.
    Come, let us gather our nets from the shore, and set our catamarans free,
    To capture the leaping wealth of the tide, for we are the kings of the sea!
    No longer delay, let us hasten away in the track of the seagull's call,
    The sea is our mother, the cloud is our brother, the waves are our comrades all.
    What though we toss at the fall of the sun where the hand of the sea-god drives?
    He who holds the storm by the hair, will hide in his breast our lives.
    Sweet is the shade of the coconut glade, and the scent of the mango grove,
    And sweet are the sands at the full o' the moon with the sound of the voices we love;
    But sweeter, o brothers, the kiss of the spray, and the dance of the wild foam's glee;
    Row, brothers row to the edge of the verge, where the low sky mates with the sea.
    In the beginning of the poem, a fisherman tells other fisherman to ____.

    A) do exercise                 

    B) wake up  

    C) catch fish                   

    D) sell fish

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer29)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    The Coromandel Fishers
    Rise, brothers, rise; the wakening skies pray to the morning light,
    The wind lies asleep in the arms of the dawn like a child that has cried all night.
    Come, let us gather our nets from the shore, and set our catamarans free,
    To capture the leaping wealth of the tide, for we are the kings of the sea!
    No longer delay, let us hasten away in the track of the seagull's call,
    The sea is our mother, the cloud is our brother, the waves are our comrades all.
    What though we toss at the fall of the sun where the hand of the sea-god drives?
    He who holds the storm by the hair, will hide in his breast our lives.
    Sweet is the shade of the coconut glade, and the scent of the mango grove,
    And sweet are the sands at the full o' the moon with the sound of the voices we love;
    But sweeter, o brothers, the kiss of the spray, and the dance of the wild foam's glee;
    Row, brothers row to the edge of the verge, where the low sky mates with the sea.
    The phrase "the leaping wealth of the tide," here refers to ____.

    A) fire                 

    B) water plants

    C) fish                   

    D) waves

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer30)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    The Coromandel Fishers
    Rise, brothers, rise; the wakening skies pray to the morning light,
    The wind lies asleep in the arms of the dawn like a child that has cried all night.
    Come, let us gather our nets from the shore, and set our catamarans free,
    To capture the leaping wealth of the tide, for we are the kings of the sea!
    No longer delay, let us hasten away in the track of the seagull's call,
    The sea is our mother, the cloud is our brother, the waves are our comrades all.
    What though we toss at the fall of the sun where the hand of the sea-god drives?
    He who holds the storm by the hair, will hide in his breast our lives.
    Sweet is the shade of the coconut glade, and the scent of the mango grove,
    And sweet are the sands at the full o' the moon with the sound of the voices we love;
    But sweeter, o brothers, the kiss of the spray, and the dance of the wild foam's glee;
    Row, brothers row to the edge of the verge, where the low sky mates with the sea.
    The fishermen are the friends of ____.

    A) sea                 

    B) clouds

    C) water animals            

    D) waves  

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer31)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    The Coromandel Fishers
    Rise, brothers, rise; the wakening skies pray to the morning light,
    The wind lies asleep in the arms of the dawn like a child that has cried all night.
    Come, let us gather our nets from the shore, and set our catamarans free,
    To capture the leaping wealth of the tide, for we are the kings of the sea!
    No longer delay, let us hasten away in the track of the seagull's call,
    The sea is our mother, the cloud is our brother, the waves are our comrades all.
    What though we toss at the fall of the sun where the hand of the sea-god drives?
    He who holds the storm by the hair, will hide in his breast our lives.
    Sweet is the shade of the coconut glade, and the scent of the mango grove,
    And sweet are the sands at the full o' the moon with the sound of the voices we love;
    But sweeter, o brothers, the kiss of the spray, and the dance of the wild foam's glee;
    Row, brothers row to the edge of the verge, where the low sky mates with the sea.
    The sea-god will take care of the fisherman's lives by ____.

    A) keeping the storm away  

    B) bringing heavy rainfall

    C) sending mighty storm

    D) filling their nets with plenty of fish

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer32)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    The Coromandel Fishers
    Rise, brothers, rise; the wakening skies pray to the morning light,
    The wind lies asleep in the arms of the dawn like a child that has cried all night.
    Come, let us gather our nets from the shore, and set our catamarans free,
    To capture the leaping wealth of the tide, for we are the kings of the sea!
    No longer delay, let us hasten away in the track of the seagull's call,
    The sea is our mother, the cloud is our brother, the waves are our comrades all.
    What though we toss at the fall of the sun where the hand of the sea-god drives?
    He who holds the storm by the hair, will hide in his breast our lives.
    Sweet is the shade of the coconut glade, and the scent of the mango grove,
    And sweet are the sands at the full o' the moon with the sound of the voices we love;
    But sweeter, o brothers, the kiss of the spray, and the dance of the wild foam's glee;
    Row, brothers row to the edge of the verge, where the low sky mates with the sea.
    The last line of the above poem means______.

    A) where the sky touches the sea  

    B) where the sky moves away from the sea

    C) where the sea embraces the sky

    D) where the sea ends

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer33)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    The Coromandel Fishers
    Rise, brothers, rise; the wakening skies pray to the morning light,
    The wind lies asleep in the arms of the dawn like a child that has cried all night.
    Come, let us gather our nets from the shore, and set our catamarans free,
    To capture the leaping wealth of the tide, for we are the kings of the sea!
    No longer delay, let us hasten away in the track of the seagull's call,
    The sea is our mother, the cloud is our brother, the waves are our comrades all.
    What though we toss at the fall of the sun where the hand of the sea-god drives?
    He who holds the storm by the hair, will hide in his breast our lives.
    Sweet is the shade of the coconut glade, and the scent of the mango grove,
    And sweet are the sands at the full o' the moon with the sound of the voices we love;
    But sweeter, o brothers, the kiss of the spray, and the dance of the wild foam's glee;
    Row, brothers row to the edge of the verge, where the low sky mates with the sea.
    Seagull is a kind of____.

    A) fish                 

    B) snake

    C) bird          

    D) weed

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer34)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    The Coromandel Fishers
    Rise, brothers, rise; the wakening skies pray to the morning light,
    The wind lies asleep in the arms of the dawn like a child that has cried all night.
    Come, let us gather our nets from the shore, and set our catamarans free,
    To capture the leaping wealth of the tide, for we are the kings of the sea!
    No longer delay, let us hasten away in the track of the seagull's call,
    The sea is our mother, the cloud is our brother, the waves are our comrades all.
    What though we toss at the fall of the sun where the hand of the sea-god drives?
    He who holds the storm by the hair, will hide in his breast our lives.
    Sweet is the shade of the coconut glade, and the scent of the mango grove,
    And sweet are the sands at the full o' the moon with the sound of the voices we love;
    But sweeter, o brothers, the kiss of the spray, and the dance of the wild foam's glee;
    Row, brothers row to the edge of the verge, where the low sky mates with the sea.
    The word 'comrades' means _____

    A) enemies

    B) leaders

    C) subordinates

    D) friends  

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer35)

    Read the poem carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    The Coromandel Fishers
    Rise, brothers, rise; the wakening skies pray to the morning light,
    The wind lies asleep in the arms of the dawn like a child that has cried all night.
    Come, let us gather our nets from the shore, and set our catamarans free,
    To capture the leaping wealth of the tide, for we are the kings of the sea!
    No longer delay, let us hasten away in the track of the seagull's call,
    The sea is our mother, the cloud is our brother, the waves are our comrades all.
    What though we toss at the fall of the sun where the hand of the sea-god drives?
    He who holds the storm by the hair, will hide in his breast our lives.
    Sweet is the shade of the coconut glade, and the scent of the mango grove,
    And sweet are the sands at the full o' the moon with the sound of the voices we love;
    But sweeter, o brothers, the kiss of the spray, and the dance of the wild foam's glee;
    Row, brothers row to the edge of the verge, where the low sky mates with the sea.
    How does the wind sleep?

    A) Like a tired child  

    B) Like an angry child

    C) Like the child of dawn

    D) All of the above

    View Solution play_arrow



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