8th Class English Comprehension Question Bank

done Comprehensions Based on General Topics

Question Bank
  • question_answer1)

    Directions: Read the following passages carefully and answer the questions that follow.
    The first essays in narrowing economic .and technological disparities have not succeeded because the policies of aid were made to subserve the equations of power. We hope that the renewed emphasis on self-reliance, brought about by the change in the climate for aid, will also promote a search for new criteria of human satisfaction. In the meantime, the ecological crisis should not add to the burdens of the weaker nations by introducing new considerations in the political and trade policies of rich nations. It would be ironic if the fight against pollution were to be converted into another business, out of which a few companies, corporations, or nations would make profits at the cost of many. Here is a branch of experimentation and discovery in which scientists of all nations should take interest. They should ensure that their findings are available to all nations, unrestricted by patents.
    The policies of aid:

    A) slighted the power dimension.

    B) overlooked the power dimension.

    C) cajoled the power dimension.

    D) were indifferent to the power dimension.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer2)

    Directions: Read the following passages carefully and answer the questions that follow.
    The first essays in narrowing economic .and technological disparities have not succeeded because the policies of aid were made to subserve the equations of power. We hope that the renewed emphasis on self-reliance, brought about by the change in the climate for aid, will also promote a search for new criteria of human satisfaction. In the meantime, the ecological crisis should not add to the burdens of the weaker nations by introducing new considerations in the political and trade policies of rich nations. It would be ironic if the fight against pollution were to be converted into another business, out of which a few companies, corporations, or nations would make profits at the cost of many. Here is a branch of experimentation and discovery in which scientists of all nations should take interest. They should ensure that their findings are available to all nations, unrestricted by patents.
    The renewed emphasis on self-reliance will promote a search for:
     

    A) causes of monotony in human life.

    B) elements of enthusiasm and self-confidence.

    C) future success leading to human satisfaction.

    D) a new criteria of human satisfaction.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer3)

    Directions: Read the following passages carefully and answer the questions that follow.
    The first essays in narrowing economic .and technological disparities have not succeeded because the policies of aid were made to subserve the equations of power. We hope that the renewed emphasis on self-reliance, brought about by the change in the climate for aid, will also promote a search for new criteria of human satisfaction. In the meantime, the ecological crisis should not add to the burdens of the weaker nations by introducing new considerations in the political and trade policies of rich nations. It would be ironic if the fight against pollution were to be converted into another business, out of which a few companies, corporations, or nations would make profits at the cost of many. Here is a branch of experimentation and discovery in which scientists of all nations should take interest. They should ensure that their findings are available to all nations, unrestricted by patents.
    Ecological crisis will affect:

    A) Weaker nations

    B) Richer nations

    C) Both [a] and [b]

    D) Political framework

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer4)

    Directions: Read the following passages carefully and answer the questions that follow.
    The first essays in narrowing economic .and technological disparities have not succeeded because the policies of aid were made to subserve the equations of power. We hope that the renewed emphasis on self-reliance, brought about by the change in the climate for aid, will also promote a search for new criteria of human satisfaction. In the meantime, the ecological crisis should not add to the burdens of the weaker nations by introducing new considerations in the political and trade policies of rich nations. It would be ironic if the fight against pollution were to be converted into another business, out of which a few companies, corporations, or nations would make profits at the cost of many. Here is a branch of experimentation and discovery in which scientists of all nations should take interest. They should ensure that their findings are available to all nations, unrestricted by patents.
    If fight against pollution turns into a business:

    A) all the nations will be equally benefittecl

    B) richer nations will prosper more.

    C) poorer nations will be impoverished.

    D) only few nations will make profit at others expense.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer5)

    Over four hundred years after his death, scholars are still unravelling the mysteries of Michelangelo's art. Recently, one mystery that was revealed was that his famous drawing of a pensive Cleopatra included a hidden drawing of a different Cleopatra on the reverse side. This hidden Cleopatra shows a tormented woman, whose eyes stare out at the viewer and whose mouth is open, screaming in horror. The two images, drawn on two sides of the same paper, can be viewed simultaneously. A second mystery concerns Michelangelo's architectural plan for the dome of St. Peter Basilica in Rome. Did he intend for the dome to look like the model he built between 1558 and 1561? Or did he change his mind after building the model and decided to elevate the dome in the way it is today? Scholars do not agree on the answer. A third mystery about one of the greatest artists who ever lived was why he destroyed hundreds or thousands of his drawings before he died. Did he feel they were unimportant? Did he want posterity to see only his finished products?
    It can be inferred from the passage that the most unusual aspect of the Cleopatra drawing is that:

    A) the figure is tormented.

    B) the figure is screaming.

    C) one drawing is hidden.

    D) one drawing is backward.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer6)

    Over four hundred years after his death, scholars are still unravelling the mysteries of Michelangelo's art. Recently, one mystery that was revealed was that his famous drawing of a pensive Cleopatra included a hidden drawing of a different Cleopatra on the reverse side. This hidden Cleopatra shows a tormented woman, whose eyes stare out at the viewer and whose mouth is open, screaming in horror. The two images, drawn on two sides of the same paper, can be viewed simultaneously. A second mystery concerns Michelangelo's architectural plan for the dome of St. Peter Basilica in Rome. Did he intend for the dome to look like the model he built between 1558 and 1561? Or did he change his mind after building the model and decided to elevate the dome in the way it is today? Scholars do not agree on the answer. A third mystery about one of the greatest artists who ever lived was why he destroyed hundreds or thousands of his drawings before he died. Did he feel they were unimportant? Did he want posterity to see only his finished products?
    The word 'pensive' (underlined) can best be substituted with the word:
     

    A) Angry                          

    B) Happy

    C) Anxious                       

    D) Thoughtful

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer7)

    Over four hundred years after his death, scholars are still unravelling the mysteries of Michelangelo's art. Recently, one mystery that was revealed was that his famous drawing of a pensive Cleopatra included a hidden drawing of a different Cleopatra on the reverse side. This hidden Cleopatra shows a tormented woman, whose eyes stare out at the viewer and whose mouth is open, screaming in horror. The two images, drawn on two sides of the same paper, can be viewed simultaneously. A second mystery concerns Michelangelo's architectural plan for the dome of St. Peter Basilica in Rome. Did he intend for the dome to look like the model he built between 1558 and 1561? Or did he change his mind after building the model and decided to elevate the dome in the way it is today? Scholars do not agree on the answer. A third mystery about one of the greatest artists who ever lived was why he destroyed hundreds or thousands of his drawings before he died. Did he feel they were unimportant? Did he want posterity to see only his finished products?
    The dome of St. Peter's Basilica:

    A) bears no relation to the one in the model.

    B) was destroyed after the model was built.

    C) is raised more than the one in the model.

    D) follows the plane of the model.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer8)

    Over four hundred years after his death, scholars are still unravelling the mysteries of Michelangelo's art. Recently, one mystery that was revealed was that his famous drawing of a pensive Cleopatra included a hidden drawing of a different Cleopatra on the reverse side. This hidden Cleopatra shows a tormented woman, whose eyes stare out at the viewer and whose mouth is open, screaming in horror. The two images, drawn on two sides of the same paper, can be viewed simultaneously. A second mystery concerns Michelangelo's architectural plan for the dome of St. Peter Basilica in Rome. Did he intend for the dome to look like the model he built between 1558 and 1561? Or did he change his mind after building the model and decided to elevate the dome in the way it is today? Scholars do not agree on the answer. A third mystery about one of the greatest artists who ever lived was why he destroyed hundreds or thousands of his drawings before he died. Did he feel they were unimportant? Did he want posterity to see only his finished products?
    According to the passage, Michelangelo is:

    A) a private person.

    B) one of the greatest artists in the world.

    C) the most famous architect in Rome.

    D) screaming in horror.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer9)

    The timing couldn't have been better. It is entirely fitting that on the eve of the Rio Olympics a sports film - Haria Yadav: Born To Swim - on an Indian child swimmer, should hit the screens. What's more significant, however, is that Haria Yadav manages to break away from a whole lot of principle arcs and formulae even while remaining squarely within the conventions of a typical Indian sports film.
    It is not weighed down by the burden of nationalism; in fact it inverts and questions it. It is not quite about winning for India. Then there is the 'triumph of the underdog' cliche. Yes there is an underprivileged child at the heart of the film but we don't wallow in the squalor of his slum life in Ranchi, nor do we celebrate his rise up from the bottom of the heap. It is about how India can actually crush its own hope for medals, trample a champion on the margins of the society than help him blossom. In fact it also makes us debate whether it is entirely ethical in dreaming of a champion in a mere five year old? For a change, it's also good not to have Mumbai and Delhi as the centre of action in a Hindi film. A new filmmaker from Jharkhand comes up with an assured debut-nicely paced, well crafted and entirely engaging. A film that is rooted in the state, brings alive the sights, sounds, lingos, colours and flavours of Jharkhand, and yet manages to speak to all.
    Yes the film is on the wonder boy from the state, Haria Yadav, but it would not be quite right to describe it as a biopic. It is not about that talented little boy but the circus that got built around him. The boy, who wets his bed, can't even tie his shoelaces and can hardly comprehend the significance of swimming as a sport and carrier.
    Like another good sports film, Paan Singh Tomar, the world of Haria is riddled with complexities, at the heart of which is his coach Biplab Das. The ambitious man drives a five year old round the bend relentlessly, pushes him to the limits yet cares enough to get him a new swimsuit, feeds him almonds and apples and cries silently on getting separated from him.
    Much rests on Aryaan Kapoor's seemingly effortless performance as ajudo coach who trains 22 orphans in his hostel and also runs a dhaba and a salon to make ends meet. Never once does Aryaan appear to act and finely balances out Biplab - neither a hero, nor a villain, just a human being with flaws and warts. There is a fine line that separates ambition from obsession, a visionary from an opportunist and Aryaan's Biplab stands very well on it. The best bit about the film is how it looks at these grey zones without being judgmental.
    'It is not weighed down by the burden of nationalism'.
    Why the author thinks that the film has not weighed down by the burden of nationalism?

    A) Because the film. is not about the social condition of an underprivileged child.

    B) Because the film is about the struggle of an underprivileged child, who is trying to rise above his obstacles.

    C) The film stresses basically, not on the life of a swimmer, but on all the circus that got woven around the wonder kid from Jharkhand.

    D) The film is all about sports, in-born talent and the necessary hard work needed to succeed.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer10)

    The timing couldn't have been better. It is entirely fitting that on the eve of the Rio Olympics a sports film - Haria Yadav: Born To Swim - on an Indian child swimmer, should hit the screens. What's more significant, however, is that Haria Yadav manages to break away from a whole lot of principle arcs and formulae even while remaining squarely within the conventions of a typical Indian sports film.
    It is not weighed down by the burden of nationalism; in fact it inverts and questions it. It is not quite about winning for India. Then there is the 'triumph of the underdog' cliche. Yes there is an underprivileged child at the heart of the film but we don't wallow in the squalor of his slum life in Ranchi, nor do we celebrate his rise up from the bottom of the heap. It is about how India can actually crush its own hope for medals, trample a champion on the margins of the society than help him blossom. In fact it also makes us debate whether it is entirely ethical in dreaming of a champion in a mere five year old? For a change, it's also good not to have Mumbai and Delhi as the centre of action in a Hindi film. A new filmmaker from Jharkhand comes up with an assured debut-nicely paced, well crafted and entirely engaging. A film that is rooted in the state, brings alive the sights, sounds, lingos, colours and flavours of Jharkhand, and yet manages to speak to all.
    Yes the film is on the wonder boy from the state, Haria Yadav, but it would not be quite right to describe it as a biopic. It is not about that talented little boy but the circus that got built around him. The boy, who wets his bed, can't even tie his shoelaces and can hardly comprehend the significance of swimming as a sport and carrier.
    Like another good sports film, Paan Singh Tomar, the world of Haria is riddled with complexities, at the heart of which is his coach Biplab Das. The ambitious man drives a five year old round the bend relentlessly, pushes him to the limits yet cares enough to get him a new swimsuit, feeds him almonds and apples and cries silently on getting separated from him.
    Much rests on Aryaan Kapoor's seemingly effortless performance as ajudo coach who trains 22 orphans in his hostel and also runs a dhaba and a salon to make ends meet. Never once does Aryaan appear to act and finely balances out Biplab - neither a hero, nor a villain, just a human being with flaws and warts. There is a fine line that separates ambition from obsession, a visionary from an opportunist and Aryaan's Biplab stands very well on it. The best bit about the film is how it looks at these grey zones without being judgmental.
    What do you think is 'exceptional5 about the film Haria Yadav: Born To Swim? (Give the most appropriate answer.)
     

    A) Though the film is about a wonder kid from Jharkhand, it's not a biopic.

    B) Though the film is about an Indian swimmer, it cannot be termed as a pure sport film.

    C) Though the film is about the struggle of a poor child , its not branded as a nationalist film.

    D) Though the film has not been made by some well known Bollywood persona, rather by a new film maker, shoot on a regional backdrop, culture, colour, lingo, etc., it touches the cord of and speaks to the audience all over.

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer11)

    The timing couldn't have been better. It is entirely fitting that on the eve of the Rio Olympics a sports film - Haria Yadav: Born To Swim - on an Indian child swimmer, should hit the screens. What's more significant, however, is that Haria Yadav manages to break away from a whole lot of principle arcs and formulae even while remaining squarely within the conventions of a typical Indian sports film.
    It is not weighed down by the burden of nationalism; in fact it inverts and questions it. It is not quite about winning for India. Then there is the 'triumph of the underdog' cliche. Yes there is an underprivileged child at the heart of the film but we don't wallow in the squalor of his slum life in Ranchi, nor do we celebrate his rise up from the bottom of the heap. It is about how India can actually crush its own hope for medals, trample a champion on the margins of the society than help him blossom. In fact it also makes us debate whether it is entirely ethical in dreaming of a champion in a mere five year old? For a change, it's also good not to have Mumbai and Delhi as the centre of action in a Hindi film. A new filmmaker from Jharkhand comes up with an assured debut-nicely paced, well crafted and entirely engaging. A film that is rooted in the state, brings alive the sights, sounds, lingos, colours and flavours of Jharkhand, and yet manages to speak to all.
    Yes the film is on the wonder boy from the state, Haria Yadav, but it would not be quite right to describe it as a biopic. It is not about that talented little boy but the circus that got built around him. The boy, who wets his bed, can't even tie his shoelaces and can hardly comprehend the significance of swimming as a sport and carrier.
    Like another good sports film, Paan Singh Tomar, the world of Haria is riddled with complexities, at the heart of which is his coach Biplab Das. The ambitious man drives a five year old round the bend relentlessly, pushes him to the limits yet cares enough to get him a new swimsuit, feeds him almonds and apples and cries silently on getting separated from him.
    Much rests on Aryaan Kapoor's seemingly effortless performance as ajudo coach who trains 22 orphans in his hostel and also runs a dhaba and a salon to make ends meet. Never once does Aryaan appear to act and finely balances out Biplab - neither a hero, nor a villain, just a human being with flaws and warts. There is a fine line that separates ambition from obsession, a visionary from an opportunist and Aryaan's Biplab stands very well on it. The best bit about the film is how it looks at these grey zones without being judgmental.
    What is so unique about Aryaan Kapoor's performance as 'Biplab Das' in the film?
     

    A) For the first time a super hero acted in a negative role.

    B) He seems very natural to the role, finely balancing out, neither as hero , nor as a villain, but just as a normal human being with flaws and strength.

    C) For the first time Aryaan Kapoor acted in a film, but he is not the hero.

    D) Aryaan Kapoor did not put forth any effort to act in the film.

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer12)

    The timing couldn't have been better. It is entirely fitting that on the eve of the Rio Olympics a sports film - Haria Yadav: Born To Swim - on an Indian child swimmer, should hit the screens. What's more significant, however, is that Haria Yadav manages to break away from a whole lot of principle arcs and formulae even while remaining squarely within the conventions of a typical Indian sports film.
    It is not weighed down by the burden of nationalism; in fact it inverts and questions it. It is not quite about winning for India. Then there is the 'triumph of the underdog' cliche. Yes there is an underprivileged child at the heart of the film but we don't wallow in the squalor of his slum life in Ranchi, nor do we celebrate his rise up from the bottom of the heap. It is about how India can actually crush its own hope for medals, trample a champion on the margins of the society than help him blossom. In fact it also makes us debate whether it is entirely ethical in dreaming of a champion in a mere five year old? For a change, it's also good not to have Mumbai and Delhi as the centre of action in a Hindi film. A new filmmaker from Jharkhand comes up with an assured debut-nicely paced, well crafted and entirely engaging. A film that is rooted in the state, brings alive the sights, sounds, lingos, colours and flavours of Jharkhand, and yet manages to speak to all.
    Yes the film is on the wonder boy from the state, Haria Yadav, but it would not be quite right to describe it as a biopic. It is not about that talented little boy but the circus that got built around him. The boy, who wets his bed, can't even tie his shoelaces and can hardly comprehend the significance of swimming as a sport and carrier.
    Like another good sports film, Paan Singh Tomar, the world of Haria is riddled with complexities, at the heart of which is his coach Biplab Das. The ambitious man drives a five year old round the bend relentlessly, pushes him to the limits yet cares enough to get him a new swimsuit, feeds him almonds and apples and cries silently on getting separated from him.
    Much rests on Aryaan Kapoor's seemingly effortless performance as ajudo coach who trains 22 orphans in his hostel and also runs a dhaba and a salon to make ends meet. Never once does Aryaan appear to act and finely balances out Biplab - neither a hero, nor a villain, just a human being with flaws and warts. There is a fine line that separates ambition from obsession, a visionary from an opportunist and Aryaan's Biplab stands very well on it. The best bit about the film is how it looks at these grey zones without being judgmental.
    In context of the passage, which of the following statements is correct?
     

    A) Hariya Yadav is an orphan staying in the hostel run by Biplab Das.

    B) Aryaan Kapoor is solely responsible for bringing all the complexities in Hariya's life.

    C) It is the excess ambition coupled with obsession on part of his coach that burns out Hariya to the extent of being nowhere.

    D) Hariya Yadav is a swimmer coached by a judo trainer.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer13)

    'A Passage to India', published in 1924, was E. M. Forster’s s first novel in fourteen years, and the last novel he wrote. Subtle and rich in symbolism, the novel works on several levels. On the surface, it is about India" which at the time was a colonial possession of Britain and about the relations between British and Indian people in the country. It is also about the necessity of friendship, and about the difficulty of establishing friendship across cultural boundaries. On a more symbolic level, the novel also addresses questions of faith (both religious faith and faith in social conventions). Forster's narrative centers on Dr. Aziz, a young Indian physician whose attempt to establish friendships with several British characters has disastrous consequences.
    When 'A Passage to India' appeared in 1924, it was praised by reviewers in a number of important British and American literary journals. Despite some criticism that Forster had depicted the British unfairly, the book was popular with readers in both Britain and the United States. The year after its publication, the novel received two prestigious literary awards" the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the Prix Femina Vie Heureuse. More than seventy years later, it remains highly regarded. In a survey of readers conducted by Water stone’s Bookstore and Channel 4 television in Britain at the end of 1996, it was voted as one of the "100 Greatest Books of the Century."
    Which of the following is not true about A Passage to India'?
     

    A) 'A Passage to India' was published in 1924.

    B) The book is about India and about relations between British & Indian people.

    C) It was not the last novel the author wrote.

    D) The novel works on several levels.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer14)

    'A Passage to India', published in 1924, was E. M. Forster’s s first novel in fourteen years, and the last novel he wrote. Subtle and rich in symbolism, the novel works on several levels. On the surface, it is about India" which at the time was a colonial possession of Britain and about the relations between British and Indian people in the country. It is also about the necessity of friendship, and about the difficulty of establishing friendship across cultural boundaries. On a more symbolic level, the novel also addresses questions of faith (both religious faith and faith in social conventions). Forster's narrative centers on Dr. Aziz, a young Indian physician whose attempt to establish friendships with several British characters has disastrous consequences.
    When 'A Passage to India' appeared in 1924, it was praised by reviewers in a number of important British and American literary journals. Despite some criticism that Forster had depicted the British unfairly, the book was popular with readers in both Britain and the United States. The year after its publication, the novel received two prestigious literary awards" the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the Prix Femina Vie Heureuse. More than seventy years later, it remains highly regarded. In a survey of readers conducted by Water stone’s Bookstore and Channel 4 television in Britain at the end of 1996, it was voted as one of the "100 Greatest Books of the Century."
    Which of the following is not true about A Passage to India'?
     

    A) The Tagore Memorial Prize

    B) Booker Prize

    C) The James Tail Black Memorial Prize

    D) All of these

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer15)

    'A Passage to India', published in 1924, was E. M. Forster’s s first novel in fourteen years, and the last novel he wrote. Subtle and rich in symbolism, the novel works on several levels. On the surface, it is about India" which at the time was a colonial possession of Britain and about the relations between British and Indian people in the country. It is also about the necessity of friendship, and about the difficulty of establishing friendship across cultural boundaries. On a more symbolic level, the novel also addresses questions of faith (both religious faith and faith in social conventions). Forster's narrative centers on Dr. Aziz, a young Indian physician whose attempt to establish friendships with several British characters has disastrous consequences.
    When 'A Passage to India' appeared in 1924, it was praised by reviewers in a number of important British and American literary journals. Despite some criticism that Forster had depicted the British unfairly, the book was popular with readers in both Britain and the United States. The year after its publication, the novel received two prestigious literary awards" the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the Prix Femina Vie Heureuse. More than seventy years later, it remains highly regarded. In a survey of readers conducted by Water stone’s Bookstore and Channel 4 television in Britain at the end of 1996, it was voted as one of the "100 Greatest Books of the Century."
    The novel received criticism for which one of the following grounds?
     

    A) The book was based on India.

    B) The book dealt with the problem of establishing cross cultural friendship.

    C) The hero of the book was an Indian.

    D) The book depicted the British unfairly.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer16)

    'A Passage to India', published in 1924, was E. M. Forster’s s first novel in fourteen years, and the last novel he wrote. Subtle and rich in symbolism, the novel works on several levels. On the surface, it is about India" which at the time was a colonial possession of Britain and about the relations between British and Indian people in the country. It is also about the necessity of friendship, and about the difficulty of establishing friendship across cultural boundaries. On a more symbolic level, the novel also addresses questions of faith (both religious faith and faith in social conventions). Forster's narrative centers on Dr. Aziz, a young Indian physician whose attempt to establish friendships with several British characters has disastrous consequences.
    When 'A Passage to India' appeared in 1924, it was praised by reviewers in a number of important British and American literary journals. Despite some criticism that Forster had depicted the British unfairly, the book was popular with readers in both Britain and the United States. The year after its publication, the novel received two prestigious literary awards" the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the Prix Femina Vie Heureuse. More than seventy years later, it remains highly regarded. In a survey of readers conducted by Water stone’s Bookstore and Channel 4 television in Britain at the end of 1996, it was voted as one of the "100 Greatest Books of the Century."
    Who is the author of the book?
     

    A) E. M. Forster

    B) W.S Maugham

    C) Sir Arthur Konan Doyle

    D) P.B Shelly

    E) None of these

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Study Package

Questions - Comprehensions Based on General Topics
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