7th Class English Sample Paper

done English Sample Paper - 4 [Download Complete Paper]

  • question_answer1)

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :                           
    The great defect of our civilization is that it does not know what to do with its knowledge. Science has given us power, fit for the God, yet we use it like small children. For example, we do not know how to manage our machines. Machines were made to be man's servants; yet he had grown so dependent upon them that they, in a fair way, have become his master. Already, most men spend most of their lives looking after and waiting upon machines. And the machines are very stern master. They must be fed with coal and petrol to drink, and oil to wash waste, and they must be kept at the right temperature. And if they do not get their meals when they expect them, they grow sulky and refuse to work, or burst with rage, and blow up, and spread ruin and destruction all around them. So we have to wait upon them very attentively and do all that we can, to keep them in good temper. Already we find it difficult either to work or play without the machines, and a time may come when they will rule us altogether just as we rule animals. And this brings me to the point at which I asked, "What do we do with all the time which the machines have saved for us, and the new energy they have given us? On the whole it must be admitted, we do very little. For the most part we use our time and energy to make more and better machines; but more and better machines will only give us still more time and still more energy, and what we are to do with them?" The answer, I think, is that we should try to become more civilized. For the machines themselves, and the power which the machines have given us, are no civilization but aids to civilization.                                                                                                                               (C.M. Joad)
    Fill in the blanks with the correct option:
    (a) Our civilization is defective because .......?
     

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  • question_answer2)

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :                           
    The great defect of our civilization is that it does not know what to do with its knowledge. Science has given us power, fit for the God, yet we use it like small children. For example, we do not know how to manage our machines. Machines were made to be man's servants; yet he had grown so dependent upon them that they, in a fair way, have become his master. Already, most men spend most of their lives looking after and waiting upon machines. And the machines are very stern master. They must be fed with coal and petrol to drink, and oil to wash waste, and they must be kept at the right temperature. And if they do not get their meals when they expect them, they grow sulky and refuse to work, or burst with rage, and blow up, and spread ruin and destruction all around them. So we have to wait upon them very attentively and do all that we can, to keep them in good temper. Already we find it difficult either to work or play without the machines, and a time may come when they will rule us altogether just as we rule animals. And this brings me to the point at which I asked, "What do we do with all the time which the machines have saved for us, and the new energy they have given us? On the whole it must be admitted, we do very little. For the most part we use our time and energy to make more and better machines; but more and better machines will only give us still more time and still more energy, and what we are to do with them?" The answer, I think, is that we should try to become more civilized. For the machines themselves, and the power which the machines have given us, are no civilization but aids to civilization.                                                                                                                               (C.M. Joad)
    (b) If the machines are not properly looked after and kept fully satisfied, ..........................
     

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  • question_answer3)

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :
    The great defect of our civilization is that it does not know what to do with its knowledge. Science has given us power, fit for the God, yet we use it like small children. For example, we do not know how to manage our machines. Machines were made to be man's servants; yet he had grown so dependent upon them that they, in a fair way, have become his master. Already, most men spend most of their lives looking after and waiting upon machines. And the machines are very stern master. They must be fed with coal and petrol to drink, and oil to wash waste, and they must be kept at the right temperature. And if they do not get their meals when they expect them, they grow sulky and refuse to work, or burst with rage, and blow up, and spread ruin and destruction all around them. So we have to wait upon them very attentively and do all that we can, to keep them in good temper. Already we find it difficult either to work or play without the machines, and a time may come when they will rule us altogether just as we rule animals. And this brings me to the point at which I asked, "What do we do with all the time which the machines have saved for us, and the new energy they have given us? On the whole it must be admitted, we do very little. For the most part we use our time and energy to make more and better machines; but more and better machines will only give us still more time and still more energy, and what we are to do with them?" The answer, I think, is that we should try to become more civilized. For the machines themselves, and the power which the machines have given us, are no civilization but aids to civilization. (C.M. Joad)
    (c) A time is soon expected to come when......................

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  • question_answer4)

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :
    The great defect of our civilization is that it does not know what to do with its knowledge. Science has given us power, fit for the God, yet we use it like small children. For example, we do not know how to manage our machines. Machines were made to be man's servants; yet he had grown so dependent upon them that they, in a fair way, have become his master. Already, most men spend most of their lives looking after and waiting upon machines. And the machines are very stern master. They must be fed with coal and petrol to drink, and oil to wash waste, and they must be kept at the right temperature. And if they do not get their meals when they expect them, they grow sulky and refuse to work, or burst with rage, and blow up, and spread ruin and destruction all around them. So we have to wait upon them very attentively and do all that we can, to keep them in good temper. Already we find it difficult either to work or play without the machines, and a time may come when they will rule us altogether just as we rule animals. And this brings me to the point at which I asked, "What do we do with all the time which the machines have saved for us, and the new energy they have given us? On the whole it must be admitted, we do very little. For the most part we use our time and energy to make more and better machines; but more and better machines will only give us still more time and still more energy, and what we are to do with them?" The answer, I think, is that we should try to become more civilized. For the machines themselves, and the power which the machines have given us, are no civilization but aids to civilization. (C.M. Joad)
    (d) The best way to use the additional time and energy that machines have given to us is

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  • question_answer5)

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :
    The great defect of our civilization is that it does not know what to do with its knowledge. Science has given us power, fit for the God, yet we use it like small children. For example, we do not know how to manage our machines. Machines were made to be man's servants; yet he had grown so dependent upon them that they, in a fair way, have become his master. Already, most men spend most of their lives looking after and waiting upon machines. And the machines are very stern master. They must be fed with coal and petrol to drink, and oil to wash waste, and they must be kept at the right temperature. And if they do not get their meals when they expect them, they grow sulky and refuse to work, or burst with rage, and blow up, and spread ruin and destruction all around them. So we have to wait upon them very attentively and do all that we can, to keep them in good temper. Already we find it difficult either to work or play without the machines, and a time may come when they will rule us altogether just as we rule animals. And this brings me to the point at which I asked, "What do we do with all the time which the machines have saved for us, and the new energy they have given us? On the whole it must be admitted, we do very little. For the most part we use our time and energy to make more and better machines; but more and better machines will only give us still more time and still more energy, and what we are to do with them?" The answer, I think, is that we should try to become more civilized. For the machines themselves, and the power which the machines have given us, are no civilization but aids to civilization. (C.M. Joad)
    (e) Write the meaning of this sentence in simple words: 'Science has given us power, - fit for the God, yet we use them like small children/??.

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  • question_answer6)

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :
    The great defect of our civilization is that it does not know what to do with its knowledge. Science has given us power, fit for the God, yet we use it like small children. For example, we do not know how to manage our machines. Machines were made to be man's servants; yet he had grown so dependent upon them that they, in a fair way, have become his master. Already, most men spend most of their lives looking after and waiting upon machines. And the machines are very stern master. They must be fed with coal and petrol to drink, and oil to wash waste, and they must be kept at the right temperature. And if they do not get their meals when they expect them, they grow sulky and refuse to work, or burst with rage, and blow up, and spread ruin and destruction all around them. So we have to wait upon them very attentively and do all that we can, to keep them in good temper. Already we find it difficult either to work or play without the machines, and a time may come when they will rule us altogether just as we rule animals. And this brings me to the point at which I asked, "What do we do with all the time which the machines have saved for us, and the new energy they have given us? On the whole it must be admitted, we do very little. For the most part we use our time and energy to make more and better machines; but more and better machines will only give us still more time and still more energy, and what we are to do with them?" The answer, I think, is that we should try to become more civilized. For the machines themselves, and the power which the machines have given us, are no civilization but aids to civilization. (C.M. Joad)
    (f) We use power of science as................

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  • question_answer7)

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :
    The great defect of our civilization is that it does not know what to do with its knowledge. Science has given us power, fit for the God, yet we use it like small children. For example, we do not know how to manage our machines. Machines were made to be man's servants; yet he had grown so dependent upon them that they, in a fair way, have become his master. Already, most men spend most of their lives looking after and waiting upon machines. And the machines are very stern master. They must be fed with coal and petrol to drink, and oil to wash waste, and they must be kept at the right temperature. And if they do not get their meals when they expect them, they grow sulky and refuse to work, or burst with rage, and blow up, and spread ruin and destruction all around them. So we have to wait upon them very attentively and do all that we can, to keep them in good temper. Already we find it difficult either to work or play without the machines, and a time may come when they will rule us altogether just as we rule animals. And this brings me to the point at which I asked, "What do we do with all the time which the machines have saved for us, and the new energy they have given us? On the whole it must be admitted, we do very little. For the most part we use our time and energy to make more and better machines; but more and better machines will only give us still more time and still more energy, and what we are to do with them?" The answer, I think, is that we should try to become more civilized. For the machines themselves, and the power which the machines have given us, are no civilization but aids to civilization. (C.M. Joad)
    (g) A time may come when machines will rule us as we rule................

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  • question_answer8)

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :
    The great defect of our civilization is that it does not know what to do with its knowledge. Science has given us power, fit for the God, yet we use it like small children. For example, we do not know how to manage our machines. Machines were made to be man's servants; yet he had grown so dependent upon them that they, in a fair way, have become his master. Already, most men spend most of their lives looking after and waiting upon machines. And the machines are very stern master. They must be fed with coal and petrol to drink, and oil to wash waste, and they must be kept at the right temperature. And if they do not get their meals when they expect them, they grow sulky and refuse to work, or burst with rage, and blow up, and spread ruin and destruction all around them. So we have to wait upon them very attentively and do all that we can, to keep them in good temper. Already we find it difficult either to work or play without the machines, and a time may come when they will rule us altogether just as we rule animals. And this brings me to the point at which I asked, "What do we do with all the time which the machines have saved for us, and the new energy they have given us? On the whole it must be admitted, we do very little. For the most part we use our time and energy to make more and better machines; but more and better machines will only give us still more time and still more energy, and what we are to do with them?" The answer, I think, is that we should try to become more civilized. For the machines themselves, and the power which the machines have given us, are no civilization but aids to civilization. (C.M. Joad)
    (h) We should always try to..............................

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  • question_answer9)

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :
    Cricket grew out of many stick and ball games played in England about 500 years ago. The word 'bat' is an old English word which simply means a club or a stick. By the seventeenth century, cricket had evolved enough to be recognised as a distinct game. Till the middle of the eighteenth century, bats were roughly of the same shape as hockey sticks, curving outwards at the bottom. There was a simple reason for this, the ball was bowled underarm, along the ground and the curve at the end of the bat gave the batsman the best chance of making a contact.
    Answer the following questions briefly:
    (a) How did the game of cricket come into being?

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  • question_answer10)

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :
    Cricket grew out of many stick and ball games played in England about 500 years ago. The word 'bat' is an old English word which simply means a club or a stick. By the seventeenth century, cricket had evolved enough to be recognised as a distinct game. Till the middle of the eighteenth century, bats were roughly of the same shape as hockey sticks, curving outwards at the bottom. There was a simple reason for this, the ball was bowled underarm, along the ground and the curve at the end of the bat gave the batsman the best chance of making a contact.
    (b) What does the word 'bat actually mean?

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  • question_answer11)

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :
    Cricket grew out of many stick and ball games played in England about 500 years ago. The word 'bat' is an old English word which simply means a club or a stick. By the seventeenth century, cricket had evolved enough to be recognised as a distinct game. Till the middle of the eighteenth century, bats were roughly of the same shape as hockey sticks, curving outwards at the bottom. There was a simple reason for this, the ball was bowled underarm, along the ground and the curve at the end of the bat gave the batsman the best chance of making a contact.
    (c) What were the shapes of bats of the eighteenth century?

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  • question_answer12)

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :
    Cricket grew out of many stick and ball games played in England about 500 years ago. The word 'bat' is an old English word which simply means a club or a stick. By the seventeenth century, cricket had evolved enough to be recognised as a distinct game. Till the middle of the eighteenth century, bats were roughly of the same shape as hockey sticks, curving outwards at the bottom. There was a simple reason for this, the ball was bowled underarm, along the ground and the curve at the end of the bat gave the batsman the best chance of making a contact.
    (d) How was the ball bowled in the eighteenth century?

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  • question_answer13)

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :
    Cricket grew out of many stick and ball games played in England about 500 years ago. The word 'bat' is an old English word which simply means a club or a stick. By the seventeenth century, cricket had evolved enough to be recognised as a distinct game. Till the middle of the eighteenth century, bats were roughly of the same shape as hockey sticks, curving outwards at the bottom. There was a simple reason for this, the ball was bowled underarm, along the ground and the curve at the end of the bat gave the batsman the best chance of making a contact.
    (e) Give the word that means the opposite of:
    (i) Simple
    (ii) Bottom

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  • question_answer14)

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :
    Cricket grew out of many stick and ball games played in England about 500 years ago. The word 'bat' is an old English word which simply means a club or a stick. By the seventeenth century, cricket had evolved enough to be recognised as a distinct game. Till the middle of the eighteenth century, bats were roughly of the same shape as hockey sticks, curving outwards at the bottom. There was a simple reason for this, the ball was bowled underarm, along the ground and the curve at the end of the bat gave the batsman the best chance of making a contact.
    (f) Find the words from the passage which means the same as:
    (i) Ancient
    (ii) Sufficient

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  • question_answer15) You are Shivani Gupta, Head Girl of Happy Days School, Indore. Write a notice for the school notice board informing the students about the Blood Donation Camp to be held by Blue Cross Society

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  • question_answer16) You are Rajat Mittal of Sarvodaya Senior Secondary School, Vikas Nagar, Delhi. You do not have the facility of learning computers in your school. Write a letter to the Principal of your school requesting him to provide the facility to the students of the school.

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  • question_answer17) Given below is the outline of a story, develop an interesting story based on the outline. (80 words) Outline : Old lion?always hungry?four friends in forest?lion sees them?says he's hungry and wants to eat them?animals scared?Hare cleverest of all?tells lion about another lion?takes him to well?lion sees his reflection?Thinks another lion?roars at him?reflection roars back, lion jumps into the well?end of lion?friends happy,

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  • question_answer18)

    Complete the sentences by choosing appropriate options.
    (i) Rajiv is a good singer........................... (isn't he? / hasn't he? aren't he?)
    (ii) We are learning French......................... (don't we? / aren't we? / didn't we?)
    (iii) You hurt him yesterday........................... (don't you? / aren?t you? / didn?t you?)
    (iv) They had only two hundred rupees..................... (weren't they? / won't they? / hadn't they?)
    (v) His sister danced well??.......................... (didn't she? / hadn't she? / doesn't she?)
    (vi) Your brother can swim well/........................ (doesn't he? / can't he? / hasn't he?)
    (vii) The dogs of this street bark......................... (don't they? / didn't they? / doesn't they?)
    (viii) Gandhi ji was a great leader/................................ (don't he? / wasn't he? / can't he?)

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  • question_answer19) Match the columns.

    (a) Peahen (a) Cock sparrow
    (b) Grandmother (b) Peacock
    (c) Hostess (c) Grand father
    (d) Hen sparrow (d) Host

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  • question_answer20)

    Rearrange the jumbled words to form meaningful sentences:
    Eg : have / obesity / changing lifestyles / among / contributed to / children
    Changing lifestyles have contributed to obesity among children.
    (a) fast foods / their / making / children / are / staple diet
    (b) causing / is / among / a great alarm / health experts /it
    (c) need / that / get / healthy food / we / to ensure / our children
    (d) the/all/food/nutrients/contain/should/essential.

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  • question_answer21)

    Read the lines from the poem and answer the following questions :
    I know that there isn't really a ghost,
    My brother tells lies to keep the shed for his den;
    There isn't anyone staring or making strange noises
    And the spider has been gone from his web
    Since I don't know when,
    I'll go into that shed one day soon,
    But not just yet...
    Questions:
    (a) What does the last line show?
    (b) What does the word 'den' means?
    (c) Who told the boy about the ghost?
    (d) What could be the motive of the brother?
    OR
    Read the passage and answer the following questions:
    One day the dog came running to him, putting his paws against his legs and motioning with his head to some spot behind. The old man at first thought his pet was only playing and did not mind it. But the dog kept on whining and running to and fro for some minutes. Then the old man followed the dog few yards to a place where the animal began a lively scratching. Thinking it was possibly a buried bone or a bit of fish, the old man struck his hoe in the earth, when a pile of gold gleamed before him.
    Questions:
    (a) Which dog is the writer talking about?
    (b) For what did the dog take the old farmer to some spot behind?
    (c) What did the farmer recover from that buried spot?
    (d) What could be the motive of the brother?

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  • question_answer22)

    Answer any four of the following questions:
    (a) Why were the messengers sent throughout the kingdom?
    (b) On getting Gopu Mama's chappals, the music teacher tried not to look too happy. Why?
    (c) What surprised Mr. Nath when Nishad first met him?
    (d) How have we learnt to control fire?
    (e) In what condition did the author find the bicycle when he returned from the tool shed?
    (f) What was the opinion of speaker's brother about the shed?

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  • question_answer23)

    Answer the following questions
    (a) How long does it take the grubs to become cocoons? What do the cocoons do?
    (b) What is an oasis? Is it of any use?
    (c) What benefits Golu met after developing a trunk?
    (d) What kind of a reaction was shown by Abbu Khan when Chandni asked for her freedom?
    (e) What was the diet that was given to Timothy, the tiger?

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  • question_answer24)

    What was the old farmer's reaction when their pet dog was killed?
    OR
    Discuss the difference in Soapy's past and present life.

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